Brad's Ultimate New York Yankees Website    -    www.HistoryOfTheYankees.com

 

Welcome to the page for: Derek Jeter - "The Captain" - "Mr. November"

Congratulations to Derek Jeter on hitting #3000!


Photo Credit: Bill Kostrounn/AP

 


  Just the 28th player to reach 3,000.
What a HR blast to reach this milestone.

 

 

 

Birth Name:   Derek Sanderson Jeter
Nickname:   D.J. or Mr. November
Born On:   06-26-1974
Born In:   Pequannock, New Jersey
Zodiac:   Cancer
College:   None Attended
Bats:   Right
Throws:   Right
Height:   6-03
Weight:   175
First Game:   05-29-1995 (Age 20)
Draft:   1992 : 1st Round (6th)

JETER'S MILESTONE HITS

No. Opponent Pitcher Date
1 Mariners Tim Belcher 5/30/95
500 Tigers Bryce Florie 7/20/98
1,000 Tigers Steve Sparks 9/25/00
1,500 Orioles Pat Hentgen 8/16/03
2,000 Royals Scott Elarton 5/26/06
2,500 Orioles Radhames Liz 8/22/08
2,722 Orioles Chris Tillman 9/11/09
3,000 Tampa Bay Rays David Price 7/9/2011

 

Derek Jeter is featured in the 2010 edition of the Forbes Celebrity 100, their annual ranking of the most powerful celebrities in movies, television, sports and publishing.
Read about it
HERE!

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Below is a shot of Jeter in 1995 at Spring Training. (Credit: Steiner Sports)

Below is an early shot of Jeter taken in 1992 in Ft. Lauderdale, FL. Photo Credit: Andrea Modica

September 23, 2008
Sports of The Times

Jeter’s Actions True to Example Set by Ripken

By HARVEY ARATON

By early Monday morning, the famous DiMaggio sign from the tunnel leading to the Yankees’ dugout was missing. Derek Jeter, prime suspect, was not talking.

“Everybody wants to know,” he said with a crooked, sheepish smile when asked if Joe D’s famous expression of pinstriped devotion — “I want to thank the Good Lord for making me a Yankee” — was the keepsake he claimed to have his eye on before the Yankee Stadium finale.

“In due time,” Jeter said.

He was finally back at his dressing stall after a long night’s demonstration of why he could have gotten away with carting out the infield if he could have figured out how to lift it from the ground.

When they handed him a microphone on the field late Sunday night and his teammates crowded ’round, his words of gratitude to the fans were heartfelt, delivered with a poised candidate’s deliberate cadence. He said he was nervous but he seemed as if he were born for the moment, and with an occasional dab of the eye, we could believe he was the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

“What I was thinking as Derek was speaking was that it was going to be one of those moments that will play over and over for the next 100 years, like Lou Gehrig,” General Manager Brian Cashman said, standing near home plate while all around him, grown Yankees multimillionaires bent over and scooped dirt into small plastic cups.

“I was thinking exactly that for him, how it doesn’t happen very often that an individual Yankee gets to address the entire Stadium on an occasion this special,” Cashman said. “And no doubt it had to be Derek.”

It had to be the player for whom the flashbulbs popped as they did for no other during each at-bat, all five hitless, in the 7-3 victory wrap of the Orioles. Jeter was still the people’s choice, as he has long been in the South Bronx, and will remain across the street next year.

He is the quiet captain, aloof even, some have argued, but everything he said Sunday night was pitched perfectly, and not just on the field. Before the game, he was asked what made Yankee Stadium so different. The lights, for one thing, he said. They always seemed brighter than elsewhere. He said he imagined actors feeling likewise playing Broadway.

“To be out there with him tonight as he spoke to the fans, as he let them know what the Stadium means to him, is something I’ll never forget,” the rookie outfielder Brett Gardner said. “You know, a lot of people say he’s a quiet captain. and maybe he is, but he’s a guy that leads by example, and that’s the kind of guy I want to follow.”

Jeter said the collective lap around the field “just kind of happened” but there was a moment when his arms were extended in the direction he wanted the Yankees to go. It was no one-man show: Mariano Rivera, Andy Pettitte and Jorge Posada remain beloved holdovers from the championship Joe Torre era, but the gesture was clearly a Jeter orchestration.

You could say that the Orioles owed it to the Yankees to play the inconspicuous role of the opponent in the staged production of self-celebration. On the night in Baltimore in September 1995 when Cal Ripken Jr. broke Gehrig’s record for the most consecutive games played, DiMaggio, of all people, graced the occasion with a rare ballpark visit. It may seem strange to younger fans after the home-run onslaught and subsequent steroid revelations, but a player merely running out to take his position at shortstop meant that much only 13 years ago.

“You could, after four and a half innings, watch him lap the field, grabbing hands all the way around, pulling America back into baseball,” I wrote of Ripken that night, sitting in the left field auxiliary press section.

In the season after a bitter work stoppage killed the World Series, Ripken reminded the country of the sport’s most appealing aspect, its men-at-work ethos. It always annoyed me to no end when people would say that McGwire and Sosa saved the game. The reality is that baseball came to a fork in the road, chose what it thought was a shortcut to riches and nearly wound up in ruin.

The season after Ripken left Gehrig behind, Jeter became a Yankee Stadium fixture at shortstop and a reminder over the past 13 years that the game is best measured by little things more than the long ball. By timely base hits and body language and grace under pressure.

“Derek is a lot like Cal because he represents all that our society aspires to be and what our game should aspire to be,” Cashman said. “Like Cal, and like most Americans, he takes his job seriously. He goes to work every day, and he does it with pride for his franchise and his city.”

After all these years, punctuated recently by Jeter’s surpassing of Gehrig, too, as Yankee Stadium’s career hits leader before they turned out its bright lights, there is nothing quiet about a statement like that.

E-mail: hjaraton@nytimes.com

 


Tom Verducci
Tom VerduccisNSIDE BASEBALL

Appreciating Derek Jeter as he reaches the 3,000-hit milestone

Story Highlights

Derek Jeter is the first player in New York Yankees history to get 3,000 hits

He has remained largely the same as both a player and a person during his career

Jeter has earned a reputation for clutch play based on his postsason success

Degradation of the athlete happens in real time now. There are no more deadlines in the always-on world, only the next tweet, the next blog, the next posting, the next camera phone shot coming off the non-stop conveyor belt of the Criticism Factory that runs around the clock.

It used to be that athletes could remain iconic because they remained unknown enough. We filled in the vast blank expanses between the highlights and the occasional press conferences with happy characteristics of our choosing, including the most inappropriate of sports clichés, "heroic."

Now, for many, we know too much. LeBron James is only the latest athlete whose reputation -- or as it wrongly is called in the sports' media version of speed chess, "legacy" -- has been sunk by TMI. The Information Age has chewed up and spit out athletes who might have remained false sporting gods in another age: James, Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Brett Favre, Michael Vick, Alex Rodriguez, Ben Roethlisberger, Kobe Bryant, Mark McGwire, Tiger Woods, Michael Phelps, Lance Armstrong, et al.

CORCORAN: Jeter's 3,000 by the numbers

Against this huge cultural shift, Derek Jeter has collected more hits than any of the great icons that ever played for the most famous and most studied franchises in sports, the New York Yankees, and done it with charm and grace that hardly seems possible any more.

Reaching 3,000 hits, as Jeter did Saturday with a third-inning home run against the Rays' David Price, is in itself an enormous athletic achievement, one that despite great leaps in training, equipment, nutrition and, yes, pharmacological assistance, remains as impressive as when baseball was played with dead balls by out-of-shape men who worked odds jobs in offseasons. From 1989 through 1994, just as ballparks were getting smaller, leagues were expanding and steroids were growing, 990 players debuted in the major leagues -- none of whom could parlay this enhanced hitter's age into 3,000 hits. That six-year gap without the start of a 3,000-hit career is the longest such gap since 1947, when Jackie Robinson integrated the game. And then Jeter came along.

He arrived with that awkward inside-out swing, a high-elbows running style that appeared to be a succession of hinges, and a dancer's body that never succumbed to the preposterous musculature of his generation. That nothing much changed about Jeter all these years, in style and comportment, is an achievement worth celebrating as much as 3,000 hits.

Think about the arc of his career in terms of how we treat our sports stars and you begin to understand this achievement better. Jeter was drafted in 1992, five years after the birth of local all-sports radio and two years before ESPN radio started taking calls from listeners. Jeter played his first major league game in 1995, the year after the web browser was introduced. He made his first All-Star Game in 1998, the year Google was founded. He hit a career-high .349 in 1999, the year the commercial camera phone was introduced. He reached 2,000 career hits in 2006, the first season after TMZ began. He has made it to 3,000 hits with satellite imagery available on your cell phone of his 31,000-square foot home.

Jeter is steadfast in revealing little about himself personally, steering clear of the look-at-me narcissism of athletes such as James. He also is fierce about filtering negativity from his life, instructing his family and friends not to bring negative media coverage to his attention, a policy challenged in the past two years by his down season last year, the acrimonious contract negotiations with the Yankees, and a season of further erosion this year.

"Difficult? Yeah, it can be difficult," Jeter said about his insulation from negativity. "I hear about it, but you take the good with the bad. I'm not going to sit and complain."

That his decline phase is playing out in such an open environment of information consumption unfairly detracts from his career. If anything, Jeter is underrated as an all-time great. His career at shortstop is one of the five greatest ever at the position, a position that arguably is the most important everyday job in baseball. No other shortstop has more hits while playing the position or has played more games there for one team than Jeter.

Among the five shortstops who have played the most games at the position overall -- Omar Vizquel, Luis Aparicio, Ozzie Smith, Jeter and Cal Ripken Jr. -- Jeter has the highest OPS and the most championship rings. He is to the position what Bill Russell is to center in the NBA -- not defined as the greatest talent but as a championship fixture.

That Jeter is known as a "clutch" player -- "Captain Clutch," in the Marvel Comics style of sports coverage -- is a vanity born from enough postseason narratives. He arrived just as baseball expanded its playoff format and did so with a team just emerging from a fallow period. His timing was impeccable -- he has played in 30 postseason series that include 147 games, the vast majority of which, because of the Yankees' popularity, has played out on prime-time national television and the arrival of high-definition broadcasts.

Joe DiMaggio, for instance, somewhat regarded as the Yankee progenitor to the Jeter Way, never played a game broadcast in color or a World Series broadcast coast-to-coast until his final season, 1951. DiMaggio played only 176 night games and only 242 games out of the Eastern time zone in his entire career, the kind of underexposure that made mythology possible, if not necessary.

If there is a clutch element to Jeter's game, however, it is that he is essentially the same player when faced with the better pitching and the increased pressure of postseason baseball. His postseason slash line (.309/.377/.472) looks a lot like his regular season profile (.312/.383/.449), which is a high compliment itself. Moreover, despite limits to his fielding range, he is a preeminent ninth-inning shortstop; when you need an out in the ninth inning you want the ball hit to Jeter. This reliability at bat and in the field, and not some superhuman powers that are enhanced in October, is what makes him "clutch."

So self-assured is his game, in fact, that he surprised me when I asked him if he ever doubted himself as a player.

"No question -- when I first started," he said. "You have doubts when you go, 'What's going on?' You cannot feel good. I hit .180 for two months [in 2004]. I know because you guys had me on the cover of Sports Illustrated hitting .189 on May 25. I know the date because it was on the cover of Sports Illustrated. I've signed a lot of them.

"So there are times when you go, 'What is going on?' But you still have to try to be positive. Even if you didn't get any hits, you have to say, 'Well, I hit the ball hard,' or, 'Well, I layed off a tough pitch.' You know what I mean? 'I drew a walk.' Something positive. Otherwise, you'd go crazy. Especially here [in New York], because here, everything isn't always whether you win or lose the game now. It's more than that."

Jeter may not like what's happened to the sports world, but it has not changed him. Even his approach to hitting is old school. Jeter, for instance, does not seek much statistical or video information. He may take a quick look at video of the opposing starting pitcher if he is unfamiliar with him, and he may check his stride or the lean of his upper body if he is not swinging the bat well, but that's about it for the depth of information he seeks.

"I like to know what pitchers have," he said. "I like to know what I'm swinging at, but other than that, I don't look at tendencies."

What works for him is the same inside-out swing that came naturally to him, one in which he pulls his hands close to this body and keeps them close as his barrel pulls through the zone and his torso rotates. There is something extraordinary about that swing and it has to do with the most fundamental element of any swing, something even the five-year old novice player is taught: Jeter keeps his head on the ball longer than just about everyone else.

It's something Don Mattingly, the former Yankees player and coach, first noticed about Jeter. Most hitters will tell you it is impossible to actually see the baseball make contact with the bat. The hitter is said to "lose" sight of the ball in about the last five feet before it crosses the plate. That's because it is extremely difficult to change the focus of the eyes so quickly -- from the soft focus of looking for the ball out of the pitcher's release point about 55 feet away, to the hard focus on an object traveling 90 mph.

"If you watch most guys their head will stop somewhere there," said Yankees hitting coach Kevin Long, demonstrating when a hitter loses focus in the last five feet of the pitch. "It's almost like Derek is able to track it all the way to the ball hitting the bat, which is another thing most hitters don't do.

"He might tell you he can actually see the ball hit the barrel. I wouldn't be surprised to hear him say that. He does keep his head on the ball it seems like to the point of contact. I'm not so sure he can't see the ball actually make contact."

Jeter, like Willie Mays and the basket catch, has given us a signature defensive highlight play that didn't popularly exist before him: the Jump Throw from deep in the shortstop hole. He hit the first November home run to end a World Series game and turned a flip home into an all-time great highlight. But it is fitting that what truly makes him great is not the spectacular play, but the most basic hitting fundamental imaginable: keeping his head on the ball.

The sports world is drastically changed from 1995, when Jeter collected the first hit of his major league career. That Jeter, in all ways that count the most, is remarkably the same in that changeable environment is, like the threshold of 3,000 hits, a rare achievement to be celebrated.

Find this article at:
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/tom_verducci/07/07/jeter.3000/index.html

Below is a list of Derek Jeter's First 100 Hits - Courtesy: Newsday - Find the full article at: http://longisland.newsday.com/sports/jeter/

 

Hit

Weekday

Month

Day of month

Year

Type of hit

Inning

Team

Pitcher

Stadium

1

Tuesday

May

30th

1995

single

5th

Seattle Mariners

Tim Belcher

Kingdome

2

Tuesday

May

30th

1995

single

7th

Seattle Mariners

Tim Belcher

Kingdome

3

Wednesday

May

31st

1995

single

5th

Seattle Mariners

Randy Johnson

Kingdome

4

Saturday

June

3rd

1995

double

4th

Los Angeles Angels

Shawn Boskie

Yankee Stadium (old)

5

Sunday

June

4th

1995

single

1st

Los Angeles Angels

Mark Langston

Yankee Stadium (old)

6

Sunday

June

4th

1995

double

4th

Los Angeles Angels

Ken Edenfield

Yankee Stadium (old)

7

Tuesday

June

6th

1995

single

6th

Oakland A's

Todd Stottlemyre

Yankee Stadium (old)

8

Wednesday

June

7th

1995

single

4th

Oakland A's

Steve Ontiveros

Yankee Stadium (old)

9

Thursday

June

8th

1995

triple

4th

Oakland A's

Mike Harkey

Yankee Stadium (old)

10

Saturday

June

10th

1995

double

4th

Seattle Mariners

Randy Johnson

Yankee Stadium (old)

11

Sunday

June

11th

1995

single

8th

Seattle Mariners

Steve Frey

Yankee Stadium (old)

12

Tuesday

September

26th

1995

double

2nd

Milwaukee Brewers

Scott Karl

County Stadium

13

Tuesday

April

2nd

1996

home run

5th

Cleveland Indians

Dennis Martinez

Jacobs Field

14

Wednesday

April

3rd

1996

single

3rd

Cleveland Indians

Jack McDowell

Jacobs Field

15

Wednesday

April

3rd

1996

single

7th

Cleveland Indians

Jack McDowell

Jacobs Field

16

Wednesday

April

3rd

1996

single

9th

Cleveland Indians

Julian Tavarez

Jacobs Field

17

Sunday

April

7th

1996

single

6th

Texas Rangers

Ken Hill

Rangers Ballpark

18

Tuesday

April

9th

1996

single

6th

Kansas City Royals

Chris Haney

Yankee Stadium (old)

19

Friday

April

12th

1996

triple

4th

Texas Rangers

Ken Hill

Yankee Stadium (old)

20

Saturday

April

13th

1996

single

6th

Texas Rangers

Gil Heredia

Yankee Stadium (old)

21

Sunday

April

14th

1996

single

3rd

Texas Rangers

Mark Brandenburg

Yankee Stadium (old)

22

Tuesday

April

16th

1996

single

3rd

Milwaukee Brewers

Scott Karl

County Stadium

23

Tuesday

April

16th

1996

single

7th

Milwaukee Brewers

Scott Karl

County Stadium

24

Wednesday

April

17th

1996

single

8th

Milwaukee Brewers

Cris Carpenter

County Stadium

25

Monday

April

20th

1996

single

4th

Minnesota Twins

Dan Naulty

Metrodome

26

Monday

April

22nd

1996

single

4th

Kansas City Royals

Kevin Appier

Kauffman Stadium

27

Monday

April

22nd

1996

single

6th

Kansas City Royals

Kevin Appier

Kauffman Stadium

28

Monday

April

22nd

1996

single

8th

Kansas City Royals

Ken Robinson

Kauffman Stadium

29

Wednesday

April

24th

1996

single

1st

Cleveland Indians

Dennis Martinez

Yankee Stadium (old)

30

Wednesday

April

24th

1996

single

4th

Cleveland Indians

Dennis Martinez

Yankee Stadium (old)

31

Tuesday

April

30th

1996

single

1st

Baltimore Orioles

Arthur Rhodes

Camden Yards

32

Tuesday

April

30th

1996

single

7th

Baltimore Orioles

Keith Shepherd

Camden Yards

33

Wednesday

May

1st

1996

single

5th

Baltimore Orioles

David Wells

Camden Yards

34

Friday

May

3rd

1996

double

3rd

Chicago White Sox

James Baldwin

Yankee Stadium (old)

35

Saturday

May

4th

1996

double

6th

Chicago White Sox

Wilson Alvarez

Yankee Stadium (old)

36

Sunday

May

5th

1996

single

6th

Chicago White Sox

Kevin Tapani

Yankee Stadium (old)

37

Monday

May

6th

1996

single

3rd

Detroit Tigers

Scott Aldred

Yankee Stadium (old)

38

Monday

May

6th

1996

single

4th

Detroit Tigers

Scott Aldred

Yankee Stadium (old)

39

Monday

May

6th

1996

single

8th

Detroit Tigers

Brian Williams

Yankee Stadium (old)

40

Tuesday

May

7th

1996

single

1st

Detroit Tigers

Richie Lewis

Yankee Stadium (old)

41

Tuesday

May

7th

1996

triple

8th

Detroit Tigers

Mike Christopher

Yankee Stadium (old)

42

Wednesday

May

8th

1996

single

3rd

Detroit Tigers

Greg Keagle

Yankee Stadium (old)

43

Thursday

May

9th

1996

single

2nd

Detroit Tigers

Greg Gohr

Yankee Stadium (old)

44

Saturday

May

11th

1996

single

4th

Chicago White Sox

Joe Magrane

Comiskey Park

45

Sunday

May

12th

1996

single

7th

Chicago White Sox

Bill Simas

Comiskey Park

46

Tuesday

May

14th

1996

single

7th

Seattle Mariners

Michael Jackson

Yankee Stadium (old)

47

Friday

May

17th

1996

single

5th

Los Angeles Angels

Jim Abbott

Yankee Stadium (old)

48

Friday

May

17th

1996

triple

6th

Los Angeles Angels

Jim Abbott

Yankee Stadium (old)

49

Wednesday

May

22nd

1996

single

2nd

Oakland A's

Steve Wojciechowski

Yankee Stadium (old)

50

Thursday

May

23rd

1996

single

4th

Oakland A's

Todd Van Poppel

Yankee Stadium (old)

51

Thursday

May

23rd

1996

single

8th

Oakland A's

Billy Taylor

Yankee Stadium (old)

52

Friday

May

24th

1996

home run

3rd

Seattle Mariners

Sterling Hitchcock

Kingdome

53

Friday

May

24th

1996

single

7th

Seattle Mariners

Sterling Hitchcock

Kingdome

54

Sunday

May

26th

1996

double

5th

Seattle Mariners

Paul Menhart

Kingdome

55

Sunday

June

2nd

1996

single

2nd

Oakland A's

Steve Wojciechowski

Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum

56

Sunday

June

2nd

1996

double

9th

Oakland A's

Billy Taylor

Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum

57

Tuesday

June

4th

1996

single

2nd

Toronto Blue Jays

Erik Hanson

Yankee Stadium (old)

58

Wednesday

June

5th

1996

home run

6th

Toronto Blue Jays

Pat Hentgen

Yankee Stadium (old)

59

Wednesday

June

5th

1996

single

8th

Toronto Blue Jays

Tim Crabtree

Yankee Stadium (old)

60

Thursday

June

6th

1996

single

3rd

Toronto Blue Jays

Paul Quantrill

Yankee Stadium (old)

61

Saturday

June

8th

1996

single

4th

Detroit Tigers

Tom Urbani

Tiger Stadium

62

Saturday

June

8th

1996

single

8th

Detroit Tigers

Mike Walker

Tiger Stadium

63

Sunday

June

9th

1996

single

3rd

Detroit Tigers

Greg Gohr

Tiger Stadium

64

Sunday

June

9th

1996

double

7th

Detroit Tigers

Greg Gohr

Tiger Stadium

65

Monday

June

10th

1996

single

8th

Toronto Blue Jays

Tony Castillo

SkyDome

66

Tuesday

June

11th

1996

single

2nd

Toronto Blue Jays

Paul Quantrill

SkyDome

67

Tuesday

June

11th

1996

single

6th

Toronto Blue Jays

Paul Quantrill

SkyDome

68

Tuesday

June

11th

1996

single

8th

Toronto Blue Jays

Tim Crabtree

SkyDome

69

Thursday

June

13th

1996

double

8th

Cleveland Indians

Orel Hershiser

Yankee Stadium (old)

70

Friday

June

14th

1996

single

6th

Cleveland Indians

Eric Plunk

Yankee Stadium (old)

71

Monday

June

17th

1996

double

7th

Minnesota Twins

Scott Aldred

Yankee Stadium (old)

72

Friday

June

21st

1996

single

10th

Cleveland Indians

Jim Poole

Jacobs Field

73

Friday

June

21st

1996

single

1st

Cleveland Indians

Julian Tavarez

Jacobs Field

74

Friday

June

21st

1996

single

3rd

Cleveland Indians

Greg Swindell

Jacobs Field

75

Friday

June

21st

1996

single

5th

Cleveland Indians

Greg Swindell

Jacobs Field

76

Sunday

June

23rd

1996

single

2nd

Cleveland Indians

Jack McDowell

Jacobs Field

77

Monday

June

24th

1996

single

7th

Minnesota Twins

Rich Robertson

Metrodome

78

Tuesday

June

25th

1996

double

2nd

Minnesota Twins

Frankie Rodriguez

Metrodome

79

Tuesday

June

25th

1996

single

2nd

Minnesota Twins

Dan Serafini

Metrodome

80

Wednesday

June

26th

1996

double

1st

Minnesota Twins

Rick Aguilera

Metrodome

81

Friday

June

28th

1996

single

3rd

Baltimore Orioles

Rick Krivda

Yankee Stadium (old)

82

Friday

June

28th

1996

double

4th

Baltimore Orioles

Rick Krivda

Yankee Stadium (old)

83

Sunday

June

30th

1996

single

8th

Baltimore Orioles

David Wells

Yankee Stadium (old)

84

Tuesday

July

2nd

1996

single

1st

Boston Red Sox

Jamie Moyer

Yankee Stadium (old)

85

Tuesday

July

2nd

1996

single

4th

Boston Red Sox

Jamie Moyer

Yankee Stadium (old)

86

Tuesday

July

2nd

1996

single

6th

Boston Red Sox

Vaughn Eshelman

Yankee Stadium (old)

87

Tuesday

July

2nd

1996

single

7th

Boston Red Sox

Joe Hudson

Yankee Stadium (old)

88

Thursday

July

4th

1996

home run

6th

Milwaukee Brewers

Scott Karl

Yankee Stadium (old)

89

Sunday

July

7th

1996

single

3rd

Milwaukee Brewers

Ben McDonald

Yankee Stadium (old)

90

Sunday

July

7th

1996

single

5th

Milwaukee Brewers

Ben McDonald

Yankee Stadium (old)

91

Sunday

July

7th

1996

single

9th

Milwaukee Brewers

Graeme Lloyd

Yankee Stadium (old)

92

Thursday

July

11th

1996

home run

8th

Baltimore Orioles

Mike Mussina

Camden Yards

93

Saturday

July

13th

1996

double

7th

Baltimore Orioles

David Wells

Camden Yards

94

Saturday

July

13th

1996

double

8th

Baltimore Orioles

Alan Mills

Camden Yards

95

Sunday

July

14th

1996

single

3rd

Baltimore Orioles

Scott Erickson

Camden Yards

96

Monday

July

15th

1996

double

1st

Boston Red Sox

Tim Wakefield

Fenway Park

97

Monday

July

15th

1996

single

2nd

Boston Red Sox

Tim Wakefield

Fenway Park

98

Tuesday

July

16th

1996

double

2nd

Boston Red Sox

Roger Clemens

Fenway Park

99

Wednesday

July

17th

1996

double

2nd

Boston Red Sox

Tom Gordon

Fenway Park

100

Wednesday

July

17th

1996

single

7th

Boston Red Sox

Joe Hudson

Fenway Park

 



Derek Jeter will be final single-digit number retired by Yankees

August 23, 2014 by STEVEN MARCUS / steven.marcus@newsday.com

Yankees' Derek Jeter reacts during the ceremony honoring

When Derek's Jeter's number is retired, it will be the end of the line of single-digit numbers over the hallowed blue pinstripes.

 

The Yankees officially took Joe Torre's No. 6 out of circulation yesterday while Jeter's No. 2 is a formality away from joining his and the other sacred numbers -- 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 42, 44 and 49 -- on the wall in Monument Park.

 

The first team to likely retire all their single numbers was also the first to place numbers on uniforms, starting the practice in 1929. Initially, the numbers were assigned based on the starting position players' everyday spot in the batting order -- Babe Ruth batted third, Lou Gehrig fourth. By 1937, Major League Baseball made it a requirement for all teams to issue numbers.

The Yankees were the first big-league baseball team to retire a numeral when they bestowed the honor on the terminally ill Gehrig in 1939.

 

It wasn't until 1954 that a team outside New York retired a number -- Pirates manager Billy Meyer's No. 1

 

Jackie Robinson's No. 42 was offically retired across the board by Major League Baseball in 2007. Mariano Rivera's No. 42, which was grandfathered from the MLB edict, was retired after he pitched his last game in 2013.

 

Including Rivera, the Yankees -- with 17 -- have the longest list of retired numbers. But the most impressive are the soon-to be-extinct single digits:

 

BILLY MARTIN

Number retired Aug. 10, 1986

Fittingly and owing to his stormy relationship with owner George Steinbrenner, Martin was brought back to manage the Yankees for a fifth time in 1988 -- two years after his number was retired. "George always came back to him because my father wasn't a 'Yes' man,'" Billy Martin Jr. said. "It may not have always been what he wanted to hear, but it was the truth, at least my father's perception of it. Their relationship was truly love-hate. He respected his loyalty and desire to win. It drove me crazy that he always wanted to be there, he was gaunt, pale, and malnourished. He loved the Yankees more than he hated putting up with what he had to be there. He'd say 'I'm a Yankee. I'm just not happy anywhere else.' "

Martin said his father and Steinbrenner had been talking about a sixth stint with the Yankees before Martin died in an automobile accident on Christmas Day in 1989. Bobby Richardson and Bobby Murcer also wore No. 1 during their Yankees career.

 

BABE RUTH

June 13, 1948

Ruth, diagnosed with a malignant tumor in his neck less than two years earlier, was honored in what would be his last public appearance at Yankee Stadium. He died on Aug. 16. Unlike Gehrig, perhaps the greatest player in baseball history did not have sole ownership of his number. Outfielder Cliff Mapes, who would go on to wear three legendary Yankee numbers, was the last Yankee to wear No. 3 -- in 1948. When he got to meet Ruth during the ceremony retiring his number, it was the fulfillment of a boyhood dream for Mapes and his family. "His dad was bound and determined for him to become a baseball player," said Mapes' daughter, Jan Mapes Cobler. "When he was born his dad went and told everybody he was going to be the new Babe Ruth. He was excited about wearing that number.''

 

LOU GEHRIG

Jan. 6, 1940

The myth is that Gehrig's number was retired on July 4, 1939, on Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day. Gehrig, suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the then-little known incurable disease recently brought to the forefront of society by the Ice Bucket Challenge, played his last game two months earlier after amassing a then-record 2,130 consecutive games. But the Yankees say the team officially retired Gehrig's number on Jan. 6, 1940 in an announcement made by team president Ed Barrow. Gehrig died June 2, 1941 at age 37.

Gehrig was the only Yankee to wear the number, which was assigned in 1929.

 

JOE TORRE

Aug. 23, 2014

Torre is the third Hall of Fame Yankee to wear No. 6. Tony Lazzeri, who also wore Yankees retired numbers 5, 7 and 23, had No. 6 for five seasons. Lazzeri does not have a retired number, and is not in Monument Park. "It would nice to see him there," grandson Matthew Lazzeri said. "If it's an oversight or some sort of qualification that hasn't been met that's one thing. His years and being in the Hall of Fame should put him in good standing, I would think, with other people that are in there. But it's never been an issue with us."

Second baseman Joe Gordon, who played mostly in the 1940s, also wore No. 6. He was inducted posthumously into Cooperstown in 2009.

Roy White wore No. 6 for 11 seasons. "You can't play for the Yankees and not be cognizant of the retired numbers," he said. "That's one of the first things you knew about the Yankees, the numbers that were retired. Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio."

White assumed the number would be retired one day but "Not from me. I figured sooner or later somebody would have No. 6 that would be great enough to have that number enshrined in Monument Park. A lot of people told me I had No. 6 longer than anybody in history. I told a lot of people when I go by there I can point and say 'Hey, there's my number in Monument Park.' "

Outstanding defensive third basemen Clete Boyer also wore No. 6. Tony Fernandez was the last Yankee before Torre to have the number. "I'm sure they will remember Joe more than they remember me," he said with a laugh.

 

MICKEY MANTLE

June 8, 1969

"My dad always said that was his proudest moment," Danny Mantle said of his father's number being retired. "It was joining Ruth, Gehrig and DiMaggio."

Mantle was assigned No. 6 when he started his big-league career in 1951 but was sent down to the minors in July by Casey Stengel. "Dad said he didn't like the No. 6,' " his son said. "When he came back [from the minors] and put on No. 7 was really when he was playing good." His son said 1951 was basically the only season Mantle wasn't injured. "His knees were our alarm clock in the morning, so I knew what he went through," he said. "Maybe he used the alcohol for pain. He's my hero, I'll tell you that."

Dr. Bobby Brown, a Yankee who played shortstop and third, briefly wore No. 7. "I always thought he was the fastest human being I ever saw," Brown said of Mantle. "And I saw Olympic sprinters."

Mantle struck up a friendship with fellow Oklahoman Cliff Mapes, who had worn No. 7 and eventually was traded to make room for Mantle. Robert Taylor, Mapes' nephew, said Mantle wrote to Mapes after the trade, saying, "Sorry you had to be traded to make room for me. Sure am glad I got No. 7 because No. 6 wasn't worth a damn."

Mapes wore No. 5 when he went to the Tigers, the number that was later retired for Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg. He also was No. 13 for the Yankees, now worn by Alex Rodriguez.

Hall of Fame manager Leo Durocher, an infielder in 1929, was the first Yankee to wear No. 7.

 

YOGI BERRA & BILL DICKEY

July 22, 1972

Both Yankee Hall of Fame catchers shared in the honor that day at the Stadium, though Yogi, then manager of the Mets, wasn't in attendance. In a recorded announcement, Berra said he was with "My Mets," and the crowd booed. Dickey reportedly said "Those boos, you know, are for the Mets, not Yogi." Berra has 10 World Series rings. At 89 and frail, Berra is seen at the Stadium for special occasions, including yesterday's ceremonial retiring of Joe Torre's number.

Dickey played with some legendary Yankees. "He was very close to Lou Gehrig," said Mary Neal Bridges, Dickey's niece. "They were roommates. He was the best man at his wedding and he told him about his illness. Another No. 8, catcher, John Grabowski, has some reflected glory attached to the number, which he received in 1929. He was on the famed 1927 Yankees. He had something of a day in his honor in 1926, though it was not organized by the Yankees. Some 2,500 fans from his hometown in Schenectady came down to the Stadium for "John Grabowski Day" and were given a lapel pin with Grabowski's name on it. Grabowski, who won two World Series rings with the Yankees, died at 46 from burns he sustained from a fire in his upstate home.

 

ROGER MARIS

July 22, 1984

Maris, who held the single-season home run record of 61 for 38 years, died 18 months after being honored. Son Kevin wears the number as coach of a high school baseball team in Gainsville, Florida. "I issued it to myself in representation to him," Maris said. "I do it in honor of him. It was one of dad's proudest moments. Mr. Steinbrenner thought enough of him. Dad couldn't be more proud of that opportunity. I don't think that registered with him at the time that he was in the line of greatness. It was mere coincidence that there was a single digit."

It still stings the family, Kevin Maris said, that some still think Maris' 61 home runs in 1961, which broke Babe Ruth's then-single season home run record of 60, was affixed with an asterisk. Roger Maris believed that to be factual, too, his son said. "Howard Cosell came to our house one year in the early 1980s and said 'Hey, Rog, do you realize there was never as asterisk put in the record books?' Dad says. 'Really, I did not know that.' He lived most of his life thinking that."

Asked about his father's mark later being shattered by others, Kevin Maris said, "Maybe they should have a syringe instead of an asterisk."

Graig Nettles was the last Yankee to wear No. 9 before it was retired.

 

JOE DiMAGGIO

April 18, 1952

The Yankee Clipper originally wore No. 9 in 1936. Longtime attorney and friend Morris Engelberg said the Yankees told DiMaggio they wanted their three stars to be 3, 4 and 5. "His favorite number was 9, he had nine rings," Engelberg said. He said 'Thirteen years and nine rings, no better percentage in any sport.' "

Uniform No. 5 was not treated with any great reverence by DiMaggio, Engelberg said. "It used to be in a paper bag, then it hung in my closet for many years." When DiMaggio died in 1999, the uniform was sold and the proceeds went to DiMaggio's staff. "He collected nothing but money," Engleberg said.

Engelberg said Steinbrenner approached DiMaggio in the '90s, telling him he wanted to imortalize him in Monument Park. "Joe said, 'I'm still breathing, still alive, I'm not going into a memorial park.' He didn't want it until after he died." DiMaggio died on March 8, 1999. His monument was unveiled April 25 of that year.

 

COMING SOON?

DEREK JETER Jeter's number could be retired Sept. 7, when he will be given a day as his career draws to a close. The Yankees retired Mariano Rivera's No. 42 last September near the end of his final season.

Several weeks ago, Jeter, who never has worn another number in the big leagues, wondered if he would be asked to speak at his day. Rest assured, he will.

The first Yankee to wear No. 2 was Mark Koenig in 1929. Gail Terry, his daughter, said of Jeter, "My favorite guy, he's the best shortstop. Maybe they'll mention that my dad wore the same number, that would be kind of nice." Koenig was the last remaining member of the '27 Yankees when he died in 1993.

 

DiMaggio was introduced to Jeter at spring training in 1996, Morris Engelberg said. "George says to Joe, 'we got this kid Jeter. Joe, he's a Hall of Famer.' Joe said. 'How can you say that?' And Joe asked him, 'What's his number?' "

White said Jeter certainly will understand his place in the line of single-digit Yankees. "I think he really realizes it," White said. "You can't be on the Yankees and not know how much that means to have your number up there."

Mike Gallego was the last Yankee before Jeter to wear the number. "It's definitely an honor to be included in the same sentence as Derek Jeter," he said through a spokesman with the A's, for whom he is the third-base coach. "He's been an ambassador of the game for many years, as we all know. It's also a privilege to be part of a trivia question."

 

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