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#28 - New York Yankees - Baseball
2004: They're in the Bronx. Parking's a joke. And they're expensive: at $80, box seats are among MLB's priciest (and that's a $4, before the credit card processing fee, bag of nuts you're eating, pal). But look at the number on the right: 1. The winningest franchise in sports has five World Series appearances in six seasons and reason enough to expect a few more. They draw at home (MLB-best 42,785 per game) and away (ditto, 34,477).
Says Brad Turnow, who runs the fan site ultimateyankees.com: "Winning never gets boring."

Click Here for: All-Time Yankees Managers  All-Time Yankees Coaches   All-Time Yankees Owners   Yankees Advertisers/Sponsors

YANKEES ALL-TIME HIT LEADERS

Rank Player Hits
1. Derek Jeter 3,316 as of 10/31/13
2. Lou Gehrig 2,721
3. Babe Ruth 2,518
4. Mickey Mantle 2,415
5. Bernie Williams 2,336
6. Joe DiMaggio 2,214
7. Don Mattingly 2,153
8. Yogi Berra 2,148
9. Bill Dickey 1,969
10. Earle Combs 1,866

 

Below is information on the franchise regarding stadiums, championships, records, and much more.
 

Franchise History
1913-present New York Yankees (AL)
1903-1912 New York Highlanders (AL)
1901-1902 Baltimore Orioles (AL)
Stadium History
2009-present Yankee Stadium III 53,000
1976-2008 Yankee Stadium II 57,746
1974-1975 Shea Stadium 55,101
1923-1973 Yankee Stadium 67,224
1913-1922 Polo Grounds II 38,000
1903-1912 Hilltop Park na
1901-1902 Oriole Park (Baltimore) na
Championship History
World Series Champions 26 - 1923, 1927, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1956, 1958, 1961, 1962, 1977, 1978, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2009
League Champions 37 - 1921(AL), 1922(AL), 1923(AL), 1926(AL), 1927(AL), 1928(AL), 1932(AL), 1936(AL), 1937(AL), 1938(AL), 1939(AL), 1941(AL), 1942(AL), 1943(AL), 1947(AL), 1949(AL), 1950(AL), 1951(AL), 1952(AL), 1953(AL), 1955(AL), 1956(AL), 1957(AL), 1958(AL), 1960(AL), 1961(AL), 1962(AL), 1963(AL), 1964(AL), 1976(AL), 1977(AL), 1978(AL), 1981(AL), 1996(AL), 1998(AL), 1999(AL), 2000(AL), 2001 (AL), 2003(AL), 2009(AL)
Division Champions 11 - 1976(AL East), 1977(AL East), 1978(AL East), 1980(AL East), 1981(AL East), 1994(AL East), 1996(AL East), 1998(AL East), 1999(AL East), 2000(AL East), 2001 (AL East), 2002 (AL East), 2003 (AL East), 2009(AL East), 2011(AL East)
Wild-Card 2 - 1995(AL), 1997(AL), 2010(AL)
Retired Numbers
1 Billy Martin
3 Babe Ruth
4 Lou Gehrig
5 Joe DiMaggio
7 Mickey Mantle
8 Yogi Berra & Bill Dickey
9 Roger Maris
10 Phil Rizzuto
15 Thurman Munson
16 Whitey Ford
23 Don Mattingly
32 Elston Howard
37 Casey Stengel
44 Reggie Jackson
49 Ron Guidry
Presidential History
2008-Present Hal Steinbrenner
1993-2008 George M. Steinbrenner
1992 Daniel McCarthy
1990-1991 Robert Nederlander
1980-1990 George M. Steinbrenner
1978-1980 Albert L. Rosen
1973-1977 Gabriel H. Paul
1966-1973 Michael Burke
1948-1966 Daniel R. Topping
1945-1947 Leland S. MacPhail
1939-1944 Edward G. Barrow
1915-1938 Jacob Ruppert
1907-1914 Frank J. Farrell
1903-1906 Joseph W. Gordon
1902 John J. Mahon
1901 Sidney W. Frank
 
New York Yankees year-by-year results

SEASON TEAM LEAGUE   W     L   PCT  GB  ATTENDANCE
2014    New York Yankees  American League - - - - -
2013     New York Yankees American League 85 77 .525 12 3,279,589
2012     New York Yankees American League 95 67 .586 - 3,542,406
2011     New York Yankees American League 97  65 .599 - 3,653,680
2010     New York Yankees American League 95 67 .586 1.0 3,765,807
2009     New York Yankees American League 103 59 .636 - 3,719,358
2008     New York Yankees American League 89 73 .549 8.0 4,298,655
2007     New York Yankees American League 94 68 .580 2.0 4,271,083
2006     New York Yankees American League 97 65 .599 - 4,243,780
2005     New York Yankees American League 95 67 .586 - 4,090,440
2004     New York Yankees American League 101 61 .623 - 3,775,294
2003     New York Yankees American League 101 61 .623 - 3,465,600
2002     New York Yankees American League 103 58 .640 - 3,465,807
2001     New York Yankees American League 95 65 .594 - 3,264,847
2000     New York Yankees American League 87 74 .540 - 3,227,657
1999     New York Yankees American League 98 64 .605 - 3,293,259
1998     New York Yankees American League 114 48 .704 - 2,919,046
1997     New York Yankees American League 96 66 .593 2.0 2,580,325
1996     New York Yankees American League 92 70 .568 - 2,250,877
1995     New York Yankees American League 79 65 .549 7.0 1,705,263
1994     New York Yankees American League 70 43 .619 - 1,675,556
1993     New York Yankees American League 88 74 .543 7.0 2,416,965
1992     New York Yankees American League 76 86 .469 20.0 1,748,733
1991     New York Yankees American League 71 91 .438 20.0 1,863,733
1990     New York Yankees American League 67 95 .414 21.0 2,006,436
1989     New York Yankees American League 74 87 .460 14.5 2,170,485
1988     New York Yankees American League 85 76 .528 3.5 2,633,701
1987     New York Yankees American League 89 73 .549 9.0 2,427,672
1986     New York Yankees American League 90 72 .556 5.5 2,268,030
1985     New York Yankees American League 97 64 .602 2.0 2,214,587
1984     New York Yankees American League 87 75 .537 17.0 1,821,815
1983     New York Yankees American League 91 71 .562 7.0 2,257,976
1982     New York Yankees American League 79 83 .488 16.0 2,041,219
1981     New York Yankees American League 59 48 .551 2.0 1,614,353
1980     New York Yankees American League 103 59 .636 - 2,627,417
1979     New York Yankees American League 89 71 .556 13.5 2,537,765
1978     New York Yankees American League 100 63 .613 - 2,335,871
1977     New York Yankees American League 100 62 .617 - 2,103,092
1976     New York Yankees American League 97 62 .610 - 2,012,434
1975     New York Yankees American League 83 77 .519 12.0 1,288,048
1974     New York Yankees American League 89 73 .549 2.0 1,273,075
1973     New York Yankees American League 80 82 .494 17.0 1,262,103
1972     New York Yankees American League 79 76 .510 6.5 966,328
1971     New York Yankees American League 82 80 .506 21.0 1,070,771
1970     New York Yankees American League 93 69 .574 15.0 1,136,879
1969     New York Yankees American League 80 81 .497 28.5 1,067,996
1968     New York Yankees American League 83 79 .512 20.0 1,185,666
1967     New York Yankees American League 72 90 .444 20.0 1,259,514
1966     New York Yankees American League 70 89 .440 26.5 1,124,648
1965     New York Yankees American League 77 85 .475 25.0 1,213,552
1964     New York Yankees American League 99 63 .611 - 1,305,638
1963     New York Yankees American League 104 57 .646 - 1,308,920
1962     New York Yankees American League 96 66 .593 - 1,493,574
1961     New York Yankees American League 109 53 .673 - 1,747,725
1960     New York Yankees American League 97 57 .630 - 1,627,349
1959     New York Yankees American League 79 75 .513 15.0 1,552,030
1958     New York Yankees American League 92 62 .597 - 1,428,438
1957     New York Yankees American League 98 56 .636 - 1,497,134
1956     New York Yankees American League 97 57 .630 - 1,491,784
1955     New York Yankees American League 96 58 .623 - 1,490,138
1954     New York Yankees American League 103 51 .669 8.0 1,475,171
1953     New York Yankees American League 99 52 .656 - 1,537,811
1952     New York Yankees American League 95 59 .617 - 1,629,665
1951     New York Yankees American League 98 56 .636 - 1,950,107
1950     New York Yankees American League 98 56 .636 - 2,081,380
1949     New York Yankees American League 97 57 .630 - 2,283,676
1948     New York Yankees American League 94 60 .610 2.5 2,373,901
1947     New York Yankees American League 97 57 .630 - 2,178,937
1946     New York Yankees American League 87 67 .565 17.0 2,265,512
1945     New York Yankees American League 81 71 .533 6.5 881,845
1944     New York Yankees American League 83 71 .539 6.0 789,995
1943     New York Yankees American League 98 56 .636 - 618,330
1942     New York Yankees American League 103 51 .669 - 922,011
1941     New York Yankees American League 101 53 .656 - 964,722
1940     New York Yankees American League 88 66 .571 2.0 988,975
1939     New York Yankees American League 106 45 .702 - 859,785
1938     New York Yankees American League 99 53 .651 - 970,916
1937     New York Yankees American League 102 52 .662 - 998,148
1936     New York Yankees American League 102 51 .667 - 976,913
1935     New York Yankees American League 89 60 .597 3.0 657,508
1934     New York Yankees American League 94 60 .610 7.0 854,682
1933     New York Yankees American League 91 59 .607 7.0 728,014
1932     New York Yankees American League 107 47 .695 - 962,320
1931     New York Yankees American League 94 59 .614 13.5 912,437
1930     New York Yankees American League 86 68 .558 16.0 1,169,230
1929     New York Yankees American League 88 66 .571 18.0 960,148
1928     New York Yankees American League 101 53 .656 - 1,072,132
1927     New York Yankees American League 110 44 .714 - 1,164,015
1926     New York Yankees American League 91 63 .591 - 1,027,675
1925     New York Yankees American League 69 85 .448 28.5 697,267
1924     New York Yankees American League 89 63 .586 2.0 1,053,533
1923     New York Yankees American League 98 54 .645 - 1,007,066
1922     New York Yankees American League 94 60 .610 - 1,026,134
1921     New York Yankees American League 98 55 .641 - 1,230,696
1920     New York Yankees American League 95 59 .617 3.0 1,289,422
1919     New York Yankees American League 80 59 .576 7.5 619,164
1918     New York Yankees American League 60 63 .488 13.5 282,047
1917     New York Yankees American League 71 82 .464 28.5 330,294
1916     New York Yankees American League 80 74 .519 11.0 469,211
1915     New York Yankees American League 69 83 .454 32.5 256,035
1914     New York Yankees American League 70 84 .455 30.0 359,477
1913     New York Yankees American League 57 94 .377 38.0 357,551
1912     New York Highlanders American League 50 102 .329 55.0 242,194
1911     New York Highlanders American League 76 76 .500 25.5 302,444
1910     New York Highlanders American League 88 63 .583 14.5 355,857
1909     New York Highlanders American League 74 77 .490 23.5 501,700
1908     New York Highlanders American League 51 103 .331 39.5 305,500
1907     New York Highlanders American League 70 78 .473 21.0 350,020
1906     New York Highlanders American League 90 61 .596 3.0 434,700
1905     New York Highlanders American League 71 78 .477 21.5 309,100
1904     New York Highlanders American League 92 59 .609 1.5 438,919
1903     New York Highlanders American League 72 62 .537 17.0 211,808


YANKEES POSTSEASON RESULTS
Year Round Opponent Result
2014 - - -
2013 DID NOT QUALIFY NA NA
2012 AL Championship Series Detroit Tigers Lost, 4-0
2011 AL Division Series Detroit Tigers Lost, 3-2
2010 AL Championship Series Texas Rangers Lost, 4-2
2009 World Series Philadelphia Phillies Won, 4-2
2008 DID NOT QUALIFY NA NA
2007 AL Division Series Cleveland Indians Lost, 3-1
2006 AL Division Series Detroit Tigers Lost, 3-1
2005 AL Division Series Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim Lost, 3-2
2004 AL Championship Series Boston Red Sox Lost, 3-4
AL Division Series Minnesota Twins Won, 3-1
2003 World Series Florida Marlins Lost, 4-2
AL Championship Series Boston Red Sox Won, 4-3
AL Division Series Minnesota Twins Won, 3-1
2002 AL Division Series Anaheim Angels Lost, 3-1
2001 World Series Arizona Diamondbacks Lost, 4-3
AL Championship Series Seattle Mariners Won, 4-1
AL Division Series Oakland A's Won, 3-2
2000 World Series New York Mets Won, 4-1
AL Championship Series Seattle Mariners Won, 4-2
AL Division Series Oakland A's Won, 3-2
1999 World Series Atlanta Braves Won, 4-0
AL Championship Series Boston Red Sox Won, 4-1
AL Division Series Texas Rangers Won, 3-0
1998 World Series San Diego Padres Won, 4-0
AL Championship Series Cleveland Indians Won, 4-2
AL Division Series Texas Rangers Won, 3-0
1997 AL Division Series Cleveland Indians Lost, 3-2
1996 World Series Atlanta Braves Won, 4-2
AL Championship Series Baltimore Orioles Won, 4-1
AL Division Series Texas Rangers Won, 3-1
1995 AL Division Series Seattle Mariners Lost, 3-2
1981 World Series Los Angeles Dodgers Lost, 4-2
AL Championship Series Oakland Athletics Won, 3-0
Eastern Division Series Milwaukee Brewers Won, 3-2
1980 AL Championship Series Kansas City Royals Lost, 3-0
1978 World Series Los Angeles Dodgers Won, 4-2
AL Championship Series Kansas City Royals Won, 3-1
1977 World Series Los Angeles Dodgers Won, 4-2
AL Championship Series Kansas City Royals Won, 3-2
1976 World Series Cincinnati Reds Lost, 4-0
AL Championship Series Kansas City Royals Won, 3-2
1964 World Series St. Louis Cardinals Lost, 4-3
1963 World Series Los Angeles Dodgers Lost, 0-4
1962 World Series San Francisco Giants Won, 4-3
1961 World Series Cincinnati Reds Won, 4-1
1960 World Series Pittsburgh Pirates Lost, 4-3
1958 World Series Milwaukee Braves Won, 4-3
1957 World Series Milwaukee Braves Lost, 4-3
1956 World Series Brooklyn Dodgers Won, 4-3
1955 World Series Brooklyn Dodgers Lost, 4-3
1953 World Series Brooklyn Dodgers Won, 4-2
1952 World Series Brooklyn Dodgers Won, 4-3
1951 World Series New York Giants Won, 4-2
1950 World Series Philadelphia Phillies Won, 4-0
1949 World Series Brooklyn Dodgers Won, 4-1
1947 World Series Brooklyn Dodgers Won, 4-3
1943 World Series St. Louis Cardinals Won, 4-1
1942 World Series St. Louis Cardinals Lost, 4-1
1941 World Series Brooklyn Dodgers Won, 4-1
1939 World Series Cincinnati Reds Won, 4-0
1938 World Series Chicago Cubs Won, 4-0
1937 World Series New York Giants Won, 4-1
1936 World Series New York Giants Won, 4-2
1932 World Series Chicago Cubs Won, 4-0
1928 World Series St. Louis Cardinals Won, 4-0
1927 World Series Pittsburgh Pirates Won, 4-0
1926 World Series St. Louis Cardinals Lost, 4-3
1923 World Series New York Giants Won, 4-2
1922 World Series New York Giants Lost, 4-0
1921 World Series Giants Lost, 5-3


Some Yankee History...

The New York Yankees first played ball in 1903 and since that time over 1,200 ball players have had the privilege of putting on the Yankee pinstripes. Since their introduction to the game, the Yankees have dominated the sport and have won a total of 35 Pennants and 24 World Series. It all started in 1903 when Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the Baltimore franchise for $18,000 and moved it to New York. The team first starting playing at the famous 10,000 seat Hilltop Park. The team was then called the Highlanders as the stadium sat on Broadway and 168th Street in Upper Manhattan. The Highlanders first coach was Clark Griffith, who was also a pitcher and won 14 games in 1903, who was hired away from the Chicago Whitesox. In the first year of existence, the highlanders finished in fourth place. The following year the great Jack Chesbro won an incredible 41 games, but the Highlanders still finished second behind Boston.
In 1913, the team changed its name to the Yankees. With the name change also came a move from Hilltop Park to the Polo Grounds. The Yankees were so popular that they outgrew Hilltop Park as fans gathered and overfilled the ballpark. Without much success and little money, Farrell and Devery sold the team to Colonels Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston and Jacob Ruppert for the sum of $460,000. At that time the new ownership wanted to change the name of team to the "Knickerbockers" after Ruppert's beer business as a part of a promotional plan. Major outcry from the fans and media caused Ruppert to change his mind and keep the name "Yankees". After three more years of more unsuccessful seasons, the Yankees decided to hire the great Miller Huggins. Huggins had an immediate impact on the team as they started moving up in the standings. But as we all know, they greatest player ever to play the game was about to make his impact on the sport. The only downside was that we would have to wait until 1920.

Babe 1.jpg (68875 bytes)

The day after Christmas in 1919, the greatest deal in the history of sports took place. Harry Frazee was to receive a total of $100,00 in return for George Herman Ruth. Col. Jacob Ruppert also agreed to loan the sum of $300,000 to Frazee to guarantee his mortgage on Fenway Park. Baseball, as we know it today, would forever be changed. The Yankees agreed to pay "The Babe" the sum of $20,000 for the 1920 season. That season Ruth hit an amazing 54 homeruns, more than any team in baseball except the Phillies. The Yankees hit an amazing 115 homeruns as a team. In 1920, Ruth hit .376 and had 137 RBIs, along with a record slugging percentage of .847. Ruth helped baseball overcome the scandal that hit baseball in 1919 called the "Black Sox Scandal" in which White Sox players were accused of throwing the World Series against the Cincinnati Reds. Also in 1920, the Yankees finally drew over 1 million fans to the ballpark with a total of 1,289,422. Ruth became the greatest sports hero of all-time surpassing the likes of Red Grange, Bobby Jones, Jack Johnson, and Jack Dempsey. He would change the game of baseball forever and be known by most as the greatest player ever to play the game. There is more great history to come....Check back soon.


The Yankee have amassed a total of 27 World Championships!


History of the Yankee Uniform

What would become the most recognizable insignia in sports—the interlocking "NY"—made its first appearance on the uniforms of the New York Highlanders in 1909. The design was actually created in 1877 by Louis B. Tiffany for a medal to be given by the New York City Police Department to Officer John McDowell, the first NYC policeman shot in the line of duty. Perhaps because one of the club’s owners, Bill Devery, was a former NYC police chief, the design was adopted by the Highlanders. It first appeared on both the cap and on the jersey’s left sleeve, replacing the separated "N" and "Y" which had appeared on the left and right breast each season since 1903 with the exception of 1905. For that season only, the "N" and "Y" were merged side by side into a monogram on the left breast—actually a forerunner of the now legendary emblem.

In 1912, their final season at Hilltop Park, the Yankees—as they were now commonly known—made a fashionable debut at their home opener on April 11. Their traditional white uniforms were now trimmed with black pinstripes, creating a look that would become the most famous uniform design in sports history. The Yankees, however, were not the first team with pinstripes and would actually abandon the look for the next two seasons. By 1915, though, the pinstripes were back for good and, with the exception of the cap, the uniform would remain relatively unchanged.

The Yankees utilized numerous cap designs—including pinstripes—from 1903 until 1922 when they finally settled on a solid navy cap with the interlocking "NY" insignia. Only one more element would now be needed to achieve a look that remains in place today. In 1917, the Yankees removed the "NY" monogram from the jersey and went with a plain, pinstripes-only look. The "NY" remained off the uniform—except for the cap—for the next 20 years until it was reinstated in 1936. The legendary Babe Ruth, therefore, actually played his entire Yankee career without ever wearing the club’s now-legendary insignia on his jersey. With the exception of minor alterations—including bolder pinstripes in the forties—the Yankee uniform has remained unchanged for more than 60 years and has, of course, grown into another of the team’s great traditions.

THE ORIGINALS:

#1 - Earle Combs
#2 - Mark Koenig
#3 - Babe Ruth
#4 - Lou Gehrig
#5 - Bob Meusel
#6 - Tony Lazzeri
#7 - Leo Durocher
#8 - Johnny Grabowski
#9 - Benny Bengough
#10 - Bill Dickey

YANKEES WERE FIRST TO MAKE UNIFORM NUMBERS PERMANENT
In 1929, the New York Yankees became the first team to make numbers a permanent part of the uniform. Other teams quickly adopted the idea and, by 1932, uniform numbers became standard for all teams. The initial distribution of numbers on the Yankees was made according to the player’s position in the batting order. Therefore, in 1929, leadoff hitter Earle Combs wore #1, Mark Koenig #2, Babe Ruth #3, Lou Gehrig #4, Bob Meusel #5, Tony Lazzeri #6, Leo Durocher #7, Johnny Grabowski #8, Benny Bengough #9, Bill Dickey #10 (Grabowski, Bengough and Dickey shared the catching duties).

WHY THE YANKEES?
When the American League moved the Baltimore Orioles to New York for the 1903 season, the club made its home at 168th Street and Broadway, one of the highest spots in Manhattan. The team would, therefore, be known as the "Highlanders" and their field "Hilltop Park." As early as 1905, however, the name "Yankees" began popping up in newspapers whose editors undoubtedly were searching for a shorter name for their headlines. By the time the franchise moved from decaying Hilltop Park to the Polo Grounds in 1913, it officially changed its name to the by then commonly-used "New York Yankees."


Important Dates in Yankee History

January 9, 1903
Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchase the defunct Baltimore franchise of the American League for $18,000 and then move the team to Manhattan.

March 12, 1903
The New York franchise is approved as a member of the American League. The team will play in a hastily constructed, all-wood park at 168th Street and Broadway. Because the site is one of the highest spots in Manhattan, the club will be known as the "Highlanders" and their home field "Hilltop Park."

April 22, 1903
The Highlanders play their first game, a 3-1 loss at Washington.

April 23, 1903
The Highlanders record the first win in franchise history, a 7-2 decision at Washington. Harry Howell recorded the win.

April 30, 1903
The Highlanders notch a 6-2 win vs. Washington in their inaugural home opener at Hilltop Park.

April 11, 1912
Pinstripes first appear on Highlanders' uniforms, creating a look that would become the most famous uniform design in sports.

April, 1913
The Highlanders are officially renamed the "Yankees" after moving to the Polo Grounds, home of the National League's New York Giants.

January 11, 1915
Col. Jacob Ruppert and Col. Tillinghast L’Hommedieu Huston purchase the Yankees for $460,000.

April 24, 1917
George Mogridge becomes the first Yankee to throw a no-hitter in a 2-1 win at Fenway Park.

January 3, 1920
The Yankees purchase the contract of Babe Ruth from the Boston Red Sox for $125,000 and a $350,000 loan against the mortgage on Fenway Park.

September, 1921
The Yankees clinch the first of their 35 A.L. pennants.

May 5, 1922
Construction begins on Yankee Stadium.

May 21, 1922
Col. Ruppert buys out Col. Huston for $1,500,000.

April 18, 1923
Yankee Stadium opens with a 4-1 win over the Boston Red Sox before a reported crowd of 74,200. Babe Ruth hits the Stadium's first home run.

October 15, 1923
The Yankees defeat the New York Giants, after World Series losses to their cross-town rivals in 1921 and 1922, for the first of 25 World Championships.

June 1, 1925
Lou Gehrig begins his record streak of 2,130 consecutive games played, pinch-hitting for Pee Wee Wanniger.

September 30, 1927
Babe Ruth breaks his own Major-League record with his 60th home run on the season's final day.

April 20, 1928
The Yankee's sixth season at Yankee Stadium opens with the left-field stands enlarged to three decks.

April 16, 1929
The Yankees become the first team to make numbers a permanent part of the uniform (numbers would become standard for all teams by 1932).

September 25, 1929
Manager Miller Huggins, who guided the Yankees to their first six A.L. pennants and three World Championships, dies of blood poisoning.

June 3, 1932
Lou Gehrig becomes the first player to hit four home runs in a single game in the Yankees' 20-13 win at Philadelphia. He remains the only Yankee to hit four home runs in one game.

July 14, 1934
Babe Ruth hits the 700th home run of his career off Tommy Bridges in the second inning of a 4-2 Yankees' win at Detroit's Navin Field.

November 21, 1934
The Yankees purchase Joe DiMaggio from the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast League for $50,000.

April 20, 1937
The Yankees' 15th season at Yankee Stadium opens with the right-field stands enlarged to three decks. The wooden bleachers are replaced by a concrete structure with the distance to center field dropping from 490 to 461 feet.

May 30, 1938
A franchise-record crowd of 81,841 attends a doubleheader sweep of the Boston Red Sox.

May 2, 1939
Lou Gehrig’s playing streak of 2,130 consecutive games ends when he does not make an appearance in a 22-2 Yankees' win at Detroit. Babe Dahlgren plays first base for the Yankees and contributes a double and a home run.

July 4, 1939
"Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day" is held at Yankee Stadium. His uniform number (4) is the first to be retired in Major League Baseball and Gehrig makes his famous "Today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth" speech.

May 15, 1941
Joe DiMaggio’s 56-game hitting streak begins with a single off Edgar Smith in a 13-1 loss vs. Chicago at Yankee Stadium.

June 2, 1941
Lou Gehrig dies of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis at the age of 37.

July 17, 1941
Joe DiMaggio’s consecutive-game hitting streak ends at 56 when he goes 0-for-3 in a 4-3 Yankees' win at Cleveland. Indians' third baseman Ken Keltner twice robs DiMaggio of hits with great fielding plays. DiMaggio then hits in the next 16 straight games to give him hits in 72 of 73 games.

January 25, 1945
Dan Topping, Del Webb and Larry MacPhail purchase the Yankees for $2,800,000 from the estate of the late Col. Jacob Ruppert. MacPhail replaces Ed Barrow as President and General Manager.

May 28, 1946
The first night game is played at Yankee Stadium and the Yankees suffer a 2-1 loss vs. Washington before 49,917 fans.

April 27, 1947
"Babe Ruth Day" is celebrated throughout Major League Baseball.

June 13, 1948
Babe Ruth’s uniform number (3) is retired at Yankee Stadium's 25th Anniversary celebration. The Babe makes his final Stadium appearance.

August 16, 1948
Babe Ruth dies in New York of throat cancer at age 53.

October 12, 1948
The Yankees announce that Casey Stengel will replace Bucky Harris as manager.

April 17, 1951
Mickey Mantle makes his Major-League debut, going 1-for-4 in a 4-0 win vs. Boston at Yankee Stadium.

September 28, 1951
In Game One of doubleheader vs. Boston at Yankee Stadium, Allie Reynolds tosses his second no-hitter of the season (he had previously no-hit the Indians at Municipal Stadium in Cleveland on July 12).

December 12, 1951
Joe DiMaggio officially announces his retirement.

April 17, 1953
Exactly two years after his Yankee debut, Mickey Mantle hits what is recognized as the game's first "tape-measure" home run, a 565-foot clout off the Senators' Chuck Stobbs at Washington's Griffith Stadium.

October 5, 1953
The Yankees win a record fifth consecutive World Championship.

October 8, 1956
Don Larsen hurls the only perfect game in World Series history, a 2-0 win over Brooklyn in Game Five at Yankees Stadium.

October 1, 1961
Roger Maris hits his 61st home run in the season's final game to establish a Major-League record.

June 24, 1962
Jack Reed’s two-run, 22nd-inning home run ends the longest game in Yankee history, a 9-7 win at Detroit.

November 2, 1964
CBS purchases 80% of Yankees for $11,200,000. The network later buys the remaining 20%.

June 8, 1969
"Mickey Mantle Day" is celebrated at Yankee Stadium and his uniform number (7) is retired.

August 8, 1972
The Yankees sign a 30-year lease to play in a remodeled Yankee Stadium to be completed in 1976.

January 3, 1973
A limited partnership, headed by George M. Steinbrenner III as its managing general partner, purchases the Yankees from CBS.

September 30, 1973
Ralph Houk resigns as manager.

April 6, 1974
The Yankees begin the first of two seasons at Shea Stadium, playing the first home game outside Yankee Stadium since 1922 (go 90-69 there in 1974-75).

December 31, 1974
Free agent Catfish Hunter signs a then-record five-year contract.

August 1, 1975
Billy Martin replaces Bill Virdon for his first of five stints as manager.

April 15, 1976
Remodeled Yankee Stadium opens with an 11-4 win over Minnesota Twins. The Twins' Dan Ford hits the first home run.

October 14, 1976
Chris Chambliss’ ninth-inning home run off Mark Littell in Game Five of the ALCS vs. Kansas City gives the Yankees their 30th pennant.

November 29, 1976
Free agent Reggie Jackson signs a five-year contract.

October 18, 1977
Reggie Jackson hits three home runs in Game Six of the World Series vs. the Los Angeles Dodgers at Yankee Stadium.

June 16, 1978
Ron Guidry establishes a franchise record by striking out 18 batters in the Yankees' 4-0 win vs. California at Yankee Stadium.

July 24, 1978
Billy Martin resigns as manager.

July 25, 1978
Bob Lemon is named manager, replacing Billy Martin.

July 29, 1978
On Old Timer's Day, the Yankees announce that Billy Martin will return as Yankee manager in 1980 and Bob Lemon will become general manager.

October 2, 1978
The Yankees, 14 games behind Boston at one point, defeat the Red Sox, 5-4, at Fenway Park in only the second playoff game in AL history.

June 18, 1979
Billy Martin returns as Yankee manager, replacing Bob Lemon.

August 2, 1979
Yankees Captain Thurman Munson dies in a plane crash in Canton, Ohio, at age 32 (his number "15" is immediately retired).

December 15, 1980
Free agent Dave Winfield signs a then-record 10-year contract.

September 6, 1981
Bob Lemon is named manager for second time, replacing Gene Michael.

April 26, 1982
Gene Michael becomes manager for second time, replacing Bob Lemon.

August 3, 1982
Clyde King is named Yankee manager, replacing Gene Michael.

July 4, 1983
Dave Righetti pitches only the sixth regular-season no-hitter in franchise history and the first since 1951, a 4-0 win vs. the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium.

July 24, 1983
The Yankees and Kansas City play the infamous "Pine Tar" game at Yankee Stadium as George Brett hits a two-out, ninth-inning home run off Goose Gossage to give the Royals an apparent 5-4 lead. The umpires nullify the homer because the pine tar on Brett's bat is above the allowable 18 inches and Brett is called out for using an illegal bat. The Yankees win 4-3 (see August 18, 1983). August 18, 1983
Kansas City's protest is upheld and the "Pine Tar" game concludes with the Royals winning 5-4. When play is resumed, Yankee pitcher Ron Guidry is in center field for the final out of the top of the ninth while left-handed first baseman Don Mattingly is at second. Royals' reliever Dan Quisenberry retires the Yankees in order in the bottom of the ninth.

April 28, 1985
Billy Martin is named manager for fourth time, replacing Yogi Berra.

October 17, 1985
Lou Piniella is named manager, replacing Billy Martin.

December 14, 1985
Roger Maris dies at age 51 in Houston, Texas.

July 18, 1987
Don Mattingly homers off Texas’ Jose Guzman to tie Dale Long’s Major-League record of hitting a home run in eight consecutive games (Mattingly hits 10 home runs during the streak).

September 29, 1987
Don Mattingly hits a grand slam off Boston’s Bruce Hurst, setting a Major-League record with six grand slams in a season.

June 23, 1988
Billy Martin is replaced as manager of the Yankees for the fifth and final time. Lou Piniella is named manager for the second time.

December 9, 1988
The Yankees sign a 12-year television contract with Madison Square Garden Network.

August 18, 1989
Bucky Dent replaces Dallas Green as Yankee manager.

December 25, 1989
Billy Martin dies in an automobile accident at age 61.

June 6, 1990
Stump Merrill replaces Bucky Dent as Yankee manager.

August 14, 1993
"Reggie Jackson Day," his uniform number (44) retired.

September 4, 1993
Jim Abbott pitches a 4-0, no-hit win over the Indians at Yankee Stadium.

May 30, 1995
Derek Jeter records his first career hit.  He gets the hit against the Seattle Mariners in "The Kingdome" in front of only 10,079 fans.

August 13, 1995
Mickey Mantle dies of cancer at age 63 in Dallas, Texas.

September 6, 1995
Lou Gehrig's Major League record of 2,130 consecutive games played is broken when Baltimore's Cal Ripken, Jr. plays in his 2,131st.

May 14, 1996
Dwight Gooden hurls only the eighth regular-season no-hitter in Yankee history, a 2-0 blanking of the Seattle Mariners at Yankee Stadium.

June 16, 1996
Mel Allen, the legendary "Voice of the Yankees" from 1939-64, dies at age 83 in Greenwich, Connecticut.

August 25, 1996
A monument in honor of Mickey Mantle is unveiled in Yankee Stadium's Monument Park.

January 22, 1997
Don Mattingly officially announces his retirement at a media conference at Yankee Stadium.

May 17, 1998
David Wells tosses only the 14th regular-season perfect game in baseball history, the first ever by a Yankee.

September 25, 1998
The Yankees establish an American-League record with their 112th win of the season (a 6-1 win vs. Tampa Bay at Yankee Stadium), breaking the mark of 111 by the 1954 Cleveland Indians (they complete the season with an AL record 114th victory on September 27 vs. Tampa Bay).

October 21, 1998
The Yankees complete an incredible season with a four-game sweep of the San Diego Padres in the World Series to capture the franchise's 24th World Championship. Their 3-0 win gives the club a record of 125-50 (114-48 in the regular season, 11-2 in postseason).

March 8, 1999
Joe DiMaggio dies at age 84 in Hollywood, Florida.

April 25, 1999
A monument in honor of Joe DiMaggio is unveiled in Yankee Stadium's Monument Park.

July 18, 1999
On "Yogi Berra Day," David Cone tosses only the 15th regular-season perfect game in baseball history one season after David Wells accomplishes the feat. Ironically, Don Larsen--who tossed a perfect game in the 1956 World Series--throws out the ceremonial first pitch.

September 9 1999
Jim "Catfish" Hunter dies at age 53 in Hertford, North Carolina.

October 27, 1999
The Yankees play Baseball's last game of the century and complete a four-game sweep of the Atlanta Braves to capture their 25th World Championship. The 4-1 win is also the club's 12th straight in World-Series play, tying the record of the 1927, 1928 and 1932 Yankees.

September 21, 2008
The Yankees play their last home game at old Yankee Stadium.

April 16, 2009
The Yankees play their first game at New Yankee Stadium.  C.C. Sabathia makes his Yankee debut in the loss to the Indians.

September 11, 2009
Derek Jeter becomes the All-Time Yankees hit leader with #2,722 off Orioles pitcher Chris Tillman.

November 4, 2009
The Yankees win their 27th World Series Title defeating the Philadelphia Phillies, four games to two at Yankee Stadium.

March 31, 2010
Historic Gate 2 at Old Yankee Stadium comes down, compliments of New York City and Turner Construction.  The effort to preserve Gate 2 was lost.

August 9, 2011
Derek Jeter records his 3,000th hit for the Yankees.  He connects off Rays pitcher David Price for a homerun and #3000!

 


More Important Dates in Yankees History

 

The First Twenty Years

The 1920s

The 1930s

The 1940s

The 1950s

The 1960s

The 1970s

The 1980s

The 1990s

Information and Stats on Current and Former Yankee Greats !

Most Valuable Players

YEAR

PLAYER

AGE

POS

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

BA

 

1923

Babe Ruth

28

OF-1B

152

522

151

205

45

13

41

130

.393

11

1927

Lou Gehrig

24

1B

155

584

149

218

52

18

47

175

.373

15

1936

Lou Gehrig

33

1B

155

579

167

205

37

7

49

152

.354

9

1939

Joe DiMaggio

25

OF

120

462

108

176

32

6

30

126

.381

5

1941

Joe DiMaggio

27

OF

139

541

122

193

43

11

30

125

.357

9

1942

Joe Gordon

27

2B

147

538

88

173

29

4

18

103

.322

28

YEAR

PITCHER

AGE

POS

G

IP

W

L

PCT

H

R

ER

SO

BB

ERA

1943

Spud Chandler

36

RHP

30

253

20

4

.833

197

62

46

134

54

1.64

YEAR

PLAYER

AGE

POS

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

BA

E

1947

Joe DiMaggio

33

OF

141

534

97

168

31

10

20

97

.315

1

1950

Phil Rizzuto

32

SS

155

617

125

200

36

7

7

66

.324

14

1951

Yogi Berra

26

C

141

547

92

161

19

4

27

88

.294

13

1954

Yogi Berra

29

C

151

584

88

179

28

6

22

125

.307

8

1955

Yogi Berra

30

C

147

541

84

147

20

3

27

108

.272

13

1956

Mickey Mantle

24

OF

150

533

132

188

22

5

52

130

.353

4

1957

Mickey Mantle

26

OF

144

474

121

173

28

6

34

94

.365

7

1960

Roger Maris

26

OF

136

499

98

141

18

7

39

112

.283

4

1961

Roger Maris

27

OF

161

590

132

159

16

4

61

142

.269

9

1962

Mickey Mantle

31

OF

123

377

96

121

15

1

30

89

.321

5

1963

Elston Howard

34

C

135

487

75

140

21

6

28

85

.287

5

1976

T. Munson

29

C

152

616

79

186

27

1

17

105

.302

14

1985

Don Mattingly

24

1B

159

652

107

211

48

3

35

145

.324

7

2005 Alex Rodriguez 30 3B 162 605 124 194 29 1 48 130 .321 12

Bold denotes league leader


Yankee Batting Title Champions

 

YEAR

YANKEE

AVG

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

1924

Babe Ruth

.378

153

529

143

200

39

7

46

121

1934

Lou Gehrig

.363

154

579

128

210

40

6

49

165

1939

Joe DiMaggio

.381

120

462

108

176

32

6

30

126

1940

Joe DiMaggio

.352

132

508

93

179

28

9

31

133

1945

George Stirnweiss

.309

152

632

107

195

32

22

10

64

1956

Mickey Mantle

.353

150

533

132

188

22

5

52

130

1984

Don Mattingly

.343

153

603

91

207

44

2

23

110

1994

PAUL O'NEILL

.359

103

368

68

132

25

1

21

83

1998

BERNIE WILLIAMS

.339

128

499

101

169

30

5

26

97

 

Bold denotes league leader


Yankee Captains

  1. Hal Chase, 1912

  2. Roger Peckinpaugh, 1914-1921

  3. Babe Ruth, 5/20/22-5/25/22

  4. Everett Scott, 1922-1925

  5. Lou Gehrig, 4/21/35-6/2/41

  6. Thurman Munson, 4/17/76-8/2/79

  7. Graig Nettles, 1/29/82-3/30/84

  8. Willie Randolph, 3/4/86-10/2/89

  9. Ron Guidry, 3/4/86-7/12/89

  10. Don Mattingly, 2/28/91-1995

  11. Derek Jeter, 6/3/2003-present


20-Game Winners

YEAR

PITCHER

W

L

1903

Jack Chesbro

21

15

1904

Jack Chesbro

41

12

 

Jack Powell

23

19

1906

Albert Orth

27

17

 

Jack Chesbro

24

16

1910

Russell Ford

26

6

1911

Russell Ford

22

11

1916

Bob Shawkey

24

14

1919

Bob Shawkey

20

11

1920

Carl Mays

26

11

 

Bob Shawkey

20

13

1921

Carl Mays

27

9

1922

Joe Bush

26

7

 

Bob Shawkey

20

12

1923

Sad Sam Jones

21

8

1924

Herb Pennock

21

9

1926

Herb Pennock

23

11

1927

Waite Hoyt

22

7

1928

George Pipgras

24

13

 

Waite Hoyt

23

7

1931

Lefty Gomez

21

9

1932

Lefty Gomez

24

7

1934

Lefty Gomez

26

5

1936

Red Ruffing

20

12

1937

Lefty Gomez

21

11

 

Red Ruffing

20

7

1938

Red Ruffing

21

7

1939

Red Ruffing

21

7

1942

Ernie Bonham

21

5

1943

Spud Chandler

20

4

1946

Spud Chandler

20

8

1949

Vic Raschi

21

10

1950

Vic Raschi

21

8

1951

Eddie Lopat

21

9

 

Vic Raschi

21

10

1952

Allie Reynolds

20

8

1954

Bob Grim

20

6

1958

Bob Turley

21

7

1961

Whitey Ford

25

4

1962

Ralph Terry

23

12

1963

Whitey Ford

24

7

 

Jim Bouton

21

7

1965

Mel Stottlemyre

20

9

1968

Mel Stottlemyre

21

12

1969

Mel Stottlemyre

20

14

1970

Fritz Peterson

20

11

1975

Catfish Hunter

23

14

1978

Ron Guidry

25

3

 

Ed Figueroa

20

9

1979

Tommy John

21

9

1980

Tommy John

22

9

1983

Ron Guidry

21

9

1985

Ron Guidry

22

6

1996

Andy Pettitte

21

8

1998 Davis Cone 20 7
2001 Roger Clemens 20  7

2003

Andy Pettitte

21

8

2008 Mike Mussina 20 9
2010 CC Sabathia 21 7


 


No-Hitters By Yankee Pitchers

Regular Season (10)

YEAR    PITCHER                                              SCORE
1917    George Mogridge, at Boston, April 24                 2-1*
1923    Sad Sam Jones, at Philadelphia, September 4          2-0
1938    Monte Pearson, vs. Cleveland, August 27 (2nd game)  13-0
1951    Allie Reynolds, at Cleveland, July 12 (night)        1-0
        Allie Reynolds, vs. Boston, September 28 (1st game)  8-0
1983    Dave Righetti, vs. Boston, July 4                    4-0*
1993    Jim Abbott, vs. Cleveland, September 4               4-0*
1996    Dwight Gooden, vs. Seattle, May 14                   2-0
1998    David Wells, vs. Minnesota, May 17                   4-0*+
1999    David Cone, vs. Montreal, July 18                    6-0+

Post Season (1) 
YEAR    PITCHER                                              SCORE
1956    Don Larsen, vs. Brooklyn, October 8 (Game Five of    2-0+
        the World Series; remains the only perfect game in 
        Series history)

NO-HITTERS VS. YANKEES   (6) 
YEAR    PITCHER                                              SCORE
1908    Cy Young, for Boston at New York, June 30            8-0
1916    Rube Foster, for Boston at Boston, June 21           2-0
1919    Ray Caldwell, for Cleveland at New York,             3-0
        September 10 (first game)
1946    Bob Feller, for Cleveland at New York, April 30      1-0
1952    Virgil Trucks, for Detroit at New York, August 25    1-0
1958    Hoyt Wilhelm, for Baltimore, September 20            1-0
2003     6 Different Pitchers, at NY for Astros June 11      8-0
       
	    * Left-handed pitcher      + Perfect Game

About One-Hitters

Yankee pitchers have thrown 56 one-hitters, the most recent coming on 9/26/97 at Detroit, when four pitchers--Andy Pettitte, Brian Boehringer, Mariano Rivera and Jeff Nelson--combined to limit the Tigers to a third-inning single by Travis Fryman...the last 2 complete-game one-hitters were tossed by Jimmy Key on 4/27/93 at California in a 5-0 Yankee win and by Mike Mussina on September 2, 2001 against the Redsox. Mussina had 13 Ks that day against Boston.

Bob Turley and Whitey Ford each hurled three CG one-hitters for New York and both men participated in a fourth...Bob Shawkey, Rip Collins, Lefty Gomez, Vic Raschi and Floyd Bevens each threw two, with one of Bevens' coming in Game Four of the 1947 World Series...Bevens was one out from a no-hitter when the Dodgers' Cookie Lavagetto doubled in two runs to give Brooklyn a 3-2 victory...it was the last game Bevens and Lavagetto ever played in the Majors.

The Yankees have been held to one hit 50 times, the last on 9/10/99 by Boston's Pedro Martinez in a 3-1 Red Sox' win at Yankee Stadium...Chili Davis' solo HR in the second inning was the Yankee's only hit...it was only the third one-hitter vs. the Yankees in the decade of the 90s (also Oakland's Steve Ontiveros on 5/27/95 at Oakland and Greg Harris/Jeff Reardon on 6/7/90 at Boston)...Joe Wood, Earl Hamilton and Nolan Ryan are the only three men with a pair of one-hitters against the Yankees, with both of Hamilton's coming in 1913...Hoyt Wilhelm, who no-hit the Yankees in 1958, tossed a one-hitter against them in 1959.

Horace Clarke and Don Mattingly are the only Yankees to twice serve as no-hit spoilers...Clarke had the only hit in no-hit bids by Jim Palmer and Joe Niekro...in a single month in 1970, Clarke broke up three no-hitters in the 9th inning, two of which wound up being more than one-hitters...on 5/2/84 at Chicago, Mattingly ruined a perfect game for LaMarr Hoyt with a wind-blown single in the seventh inning, and on 6/29/85 vs. Milwaukee, he also broke up a no-hit bid by Moose Haas, again with a seventh-inning single...on 9/12/81 at Yankee Stadium, Boston LHP Bob Ojeda took a no-hitter into the ninth inning only to have Rick Cerone lead off with a double, followed by a Dave Winfield double.


Yankees in the Hall of Fame

According to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, the New York Yankees have better representation than any other club, with 23 members (the New York Giants have placed the most players in the Hall with 20)....for the purpose of their comparison, games played was the determining factor for position players who suited up for more than one club....for pitchers, games won was the yardstick used....based on the Hall of Fame's criteria, therefore, both Reggie Jackson and "Catfish" Hunter are not counted among the Yankees' 23 representatives as Jackson played more games for Oakland and Hunter won more games with the A's....both players, however, played five distinguished seasons for the Yankees....the former Yankee players, managers and executives in the Hall of Fame are (year of election in parenthesis):

Ed Barrow (1953)      Waite Hoyt (1969)         Joe McCarthy (1957)
Yogi Berra (1972)     Catfish Hunter (1987)     Herb Pennock (1948)
Jack Chesbro (1946)   Miller Huggins (1964)     Phil Rizzuto (1994)
Earle Combs (1970)    Reggie Jackson (1993)     Red Ruffing (1967)
Bill Dickey (1954)    Willie Keeler (1939)      Babe Ruth (1936)
Joe DiMaggio (1955)   Tony Lazzeri (1991)       Casey Stengel (1966)
Whitey Ford (1974)    Larry MacPhail (1978)     George Weiss (1970)
Lou Gehrig (1939)     Lee MacPhail (1998)
Lefty Gomez (1972)    Mickey Mantle (1974)

Other members of the Baseball Hall of Fame who also played for or managed for the Yankees are: Frank "Home Run" Baker" (1955), Frank Chance (1946), Stan Coveleskie (1969), Clark Griffith (1945), Burleigh Grimes (1964), Bucky Harris (1975), Bill McKechnie (1962), Johnny Mize (1981), Phil Niekro (1996), Gaylord Perry (1991), Branch Rickey (1967), Joe Sewell (1977), Enos Slaughter (1985), Dazzy Vance (1955), Paul Waner (1952) and Dave Winfield (2000).

New York Yankees

Managers & Finishes

Year Uniform # Manager(s) Wins Losses WP Position GB
1913

n/a

Frank Chance

57 94 .377 7th 38
1914

n/a

60 74 .448 6th 30

n/a

Roger Peckinpaugh

10 10 .500
1915

n/a

Bill Donovan

69 83 .454 5th 32½
1916

n/a

80 74 .519 4th 11
1917

n/a

71 82 .464 6th 28½
1918

n/a

Miller Huggins

60 63 .488 4th 13½
1919

n/a

80 59 .576 3rd
1920

n/a

95 59 .617 3rd 3
1921

n/a

98 55 .641 1st +4½
1922

n/a

94 60 .610 1st +1
1923

n/a

98 54 .645 1st +16
1924

n/a

89 63 .586 2nd 2
1925

n/a

69 85 .448 7th 30
1926

n/a

91 63 .591 1st +3
1927

n/a

110 44 .714 1st +19
1928

n/a

101 53 .656 1st +2½
1929

n/a

82 61 .573 2nd 18

34

Art Fletcher

6 5 .545
1930

n/a

Bob Shawkey

86 68 .558 3rd 16
1931

n/a

Joe McCarthy

94 59 .614 2nd 13½
1932

n/a

107 47 .695 1st +13
1933

n/a

91 59 .607 2nd 7
1934

n/a

94 60 .610 2nd 7
1935

n/a

89 60 .597 2nd 3
1936

n/a

102 51 .667 1st +19½
1937

n/a

102 52 .662 1st +13
1938

n/a

99 53 .651 1st +9½
1939

n/a

106 45 .702 1st +17
1940

n/a

88 66 .571 3rd 2
1941

n/a

101 53 .656 1st +17
1942

n/a

103 51 .669 1st +9
1943

n/a

98 56 .636 1st +13½
1944

n/a

83 71 .539 3rd 6
1945

n/a

81 71 .533 4th
1946

n/a

22 13 .629 3rd 17

8

Bill Dickey

57 48 .543

32

Johnny Neun

8 6 .571
1947

37

Bucky Harris

97 57 .630 1st +12
1948

37

94 60 .610 3rd
1949

37

Casey Stengel

97 57 .630 1st +1
1950

37

98 56 .636 1st +3
1951

37

98 56 .636 1st +5
1952

37

95 59 .617 1st +2
1953

37

99 52 .656 1st +8½
1954

37

103 51 .669 2nd 8
1955

37

96 58 .623 1st +3
1956

37

97 57 .630 1st +9
1957

37

98 56 .636 1st +8
1958

37

92 62 .597 1st +10
1959

37

79 75 .513 3rd 15
1960

37

97 57 .630 1st +8
1961

51, 35

Ralph Houk

109 53 .673 1st +8
1962

35

96 66 .593 1st +5
1963

35

104 57 .646 1st +10½
1964

8

Yogi Berra

99 63 .611 1st +1
1965

21

Johnny Keane

77 85 .475 6th 25
1966

21

4 16 .200 10th 26½

35

Ralph Houk

66 73 .475
1967

35

72 90 .444 9th 20
1968

35

83 79 .512 5th 20
1969

35

80 81 .497 5th 28½
1970

35

93 69 .574 2nd 15
1971

35

82 80 .506 4th 21
1972

35

79 76 .510 4th
1973

35

80 82 .494 4th 17
1974

21

Bill Virdon

89 73 .549 2nd 2
1975

21

53 51 .510 3rd 12

1

Billy Martin

30 26 .536
1976

1

97 62 .610 1st +10½
1977

1

100 62 .617 1st +2½
1978

1

52 42 .553 1st +1

34

Dick Howser

0

1

.000

21

Bob Lemon

48 20 .706
1979

21

34 31 .523 4th 13½

1

Billy Martin

55 40 .579
1980

34

Dick Howser

103 59 .636 1st +3
1981

11

Gene Michael

48 34 .585 1st / 6th 2

21

Bob Lemon

11 14 .440
1982

21

6 8 .429 5th 16

11

Gene Michael

44 42 .512

42

Clyde King

29 33 .468
1983

1

Billy Martin

91 71 .562 3rd 7
1984

8

Yogi Berra

87 75 .537 3rd 17
1985

8

6 10 .375 2nd 2

1

Billy Martin

91 54 .628
1986

14

Lou Piniella

90 72 .556 2nd
1987

14

89 73 .549 4th 9
1988

14

45 48 .484 5th

1

Billy Martin

40 28 .588
1989

46

Dallas Green

56 65 .463 5th 14½

30

Bucky Dent

18 22 .450
1990

20

18 31 .367 7th 21

46

Stump Merrill

49 64 .434
1991

22

71 91 .438 5th 20
1992

11

Buck Showalter

76 86 .469 4th 20
1993

11

88 74 .543 2nd 7
1994

11

70 43 .619 1st +6½
1995

11

79 65 .549 2nd 7
1996

6

Joe Torre

92 70 .568 1st +4
1997

6

96 66 .593 2nd 2
1998

6

114 48 .704 1st +22
1999

6

98 64 .605 1st +4
2000

6

87 74 .540 1st +2½
2001

6

95 65 .594 1st +13½
2002

6

103

58

.640

1st +10½
2003 6 101 61 .623 1st +6
2004 6 101 61 .623 1st +3
2005 6 95 67 .586 1st 0
2006

6

97

65

.599

1st +10
2007 6 94 68 .580 2nd -2
2008

 

Joe Girardi

89 73 .549 3rd -8
2009 27 Joe Girardi 103 59 .636 1st +8
2010 28 Joe Girardi 95 67 .586 2nd 1
2011 28 Joe Girardi 97 65 .599 1st 6
2012 28 Joe Girardi 95 67 .586 1st -
2013 28 Joe Girardi 85 77 .525 4th 12.0
2014 28 Joe Girardi - - - - -
 

 

ALL-TIME YANKEES MANAGERS
Name Years managed Record
Joe Girardi 2008-present 564-408
(thru 2013)
Joe Torre 1996-2007 1173-767
Buck Showalter 1992-95 313-268
Stump Merrill 1990-91 120-155
Bucky Dent 1989-90 36-53
Dallas Green 1989 56-65
Lou Piniella 1986-87, 1988 224-193
Clyde King 1982 29-33
Gene Michael 1981, 1982 92-76
Dick Howser 1980 103-60
Bob Lemon 1978-79, 1981-82 99-73
Billy Martin 1975-78, 1979, 1983, 1985, 1988 556-385
Bill Virdon 1974-75 142-124
Johnny Keane 1965-66 81-101
Yogi Berra 1964, 1984-85 192-148
Ralph Houk 1961-63, 1966-73 944-806
Casey Stengel 1949-60 1149-696
Bucky Harris 1947-48 191-117
Johnny Neun 1946 8-6
Bill Dickey 1946 57-48
Joe McCarthy 1931-46 1460-867
Bob Shawkey 1930 86-68
Art Fletcher 1929 6-5
Miller Huggins 1918-29 1067-719
Bill Donovan 1915-17 220-239
Roger Peckinpaugh 1914 10-10
Frank Chance 1913-14 117-168
Harry Wolverton 1912 50-102
Hal Chase 1910-11 85-78
George Stallings 1909-10 153-138
Norm Elberfeld 1908 27-71
Clark Griffith 1903-08 419-370

 

ALL-TIME YANKEES COACHES
Name Years served
Joe Altobelli 1981-82, 1986
Loren Babe 1967
Yogi Berra 1963, 1976-83
Clete Boyer 1988, 1992-94
Cloyd Boyer 1975, 1977
Jimmy Burke 1931-32
Brian Butterfield 1994
Jose Cardenal 1996-99
Chris Chambliss 1988, 1996-00
Tony Cloninger 1992-01
Earle Combs 1935-44
Mark Connor 1984-85, 1986-87, 1990-93
Billy Connors 1989-90, 1994-95, 2000
Nardi Contraris 1995
Pat Corrales 1989
John Corriden 1947-48
Bobby Cox 1977
Frank Crosetti 1946-68
Cot Deal 1965
Gary Denbo 2001
Rick Down 1993-95, 2002-03
Bill Dickey 1949-57, 1960
Chuck Dressen 1947-48
Dave Eiland - Pitching Coach 2008-2010
Lee Elia 1989
Sammy Ellis 1982-84, 1986
Darrell Evans 1990
Mike Ferraro 1979-82, 1987-91
Art Fletcher 1927-45
Whitey Ford 1964, 1968, 1974-75
Art Fowler 1977-79, 1983,1988
Charlie Fox 1989
Jimmy Gleason 1964
Mike Harkey - Bullpen Coach 2008-2010
Jim Hegan 1960-73, 1980
Tommy Henrich 1951
Marc Hill 1991
Ralph Houk 1953-54, 1958-60
Elston Howard 1969-80
Frank Howard 1989, 1991-93
Dick Howser 1969-79
Mickey Kelleher - First Base Coach 2009-2010
Charlie Keller 1957, 1959
Clyde King 1978, 1981-82
Charlie Lau 1980-81
Bob Lemon 1976
Kevin Long - Hitting Coach 2007-2010
Eddie Lopat 1960
Mickey Mantle 1970
Harry Mathews 1929
Lee Mazzilli 2000-2003
Fred Merkle 1926
Stump Merrill 1985, 1987
Russ “Monk” Meyer 1992
Gene Michael 1978, 1984-86
Geo. Mitterwald 1988
Bill Monboquette 1985-86
Tom Morgan 1979
Wally Moses 1961-62, 1966
Ed Napolean 1992-93
Graig Nettles 1991
Tom Nieto 2000-01
Johnny Neun 1946
Charlie O’Leary 1921-30
Tony Pena - Bench Coach 2009-2010
Tony Pena - First Base Coach 2006-2008
Cy Perkins 1933
Lou Piniella 1985
Willie Randolph 1994-Present
Frank Roth 1921
Glenn Sherlock 1995
Buck Showalter 1991
Joe Sparks 1990
John Stearns 1989
Mel Stottlemyre 1996-Present
Champ Summers 1990
Rob Thomson - Third Base Coach 2009-2010
Rob Thomson - Bench Coach 2008
Jeff Torborg 1979-88
Mickey Vernon 1982
Jerry Walker 1982
Jay Ward 1987
Roy White 1983-84, 1986
Stan Williams 1980-82, 1988
Mel Wright 1974
Don Zimmer 1983, 1986, 1996-2003
 

 

ALL-TIME YANKEES OWNERS
Owners Years
Hal Steinbrenner 2008-Present
George M. Steinbrenner 1973-2008
CBS 1964-73
Dan Topping, Del Webb, and Larry MacPhail 1945-64
Colonel Jacob Ruppert 1922-45
Col. Jacob Ruppert and Col. Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston 1915-22
Frank Ferrell and Bill Devery 1903-15

Yankees Franchise History

Main article: History of the New York Yankees

Original Baltimore Orioles logo

Origins: the Baltimore Era (1901-1902)

At the end of 1900, Western League president Ban Johnson reorganized the league, adding teams in three Eastern cities, forming the American League. Plans to put a team in New York City were blocked by the National League's New York Giants, who had enough political power to keep the AL out. Instead, a team was put in Baltimore, Maryland, a city which had been abandoned when the NL contracted from 12 to 8 teams in 1900.

The team, known as the Baltimore Orioles, began playing in 1901. In the middle of the 1902 season, the Giants gained controlling interest of the team and began raiding it for players, until the AL stepped in and took control of the team. In January 1903, a "peace conference" was held between the two leagues to settle disputes and try to coexist. One of the results of the conference was that the NL agreed to let the "junior circuit" establish a franchise in New York. The Orioles' new owners, Frank J. Farrell and William S. Devery, found a ballpark location not blocked by the Giants, and Baltimore's team moved to New York.

Hilltop Park, home of the Highlanders

Hilltop Park, home of the Highlanders

Move to New York: the Highlanders Era (1903-1912)

The new ballpark was constructed in northern Manhattan, at one of the island's highest points, between 165th and 168th Streets. Hilltop Park, (formally known as "American League Park") was much smaller than the Polo Grounds, the Giants' home just a few blocks away. The team came to be known as the New York Highlanders for two reasons: a reference to the team's elevated location and to the noted British military unit The Gordon Highlanders, which made sense, as the team's president from 1903 to 1906 was Joseph Gordon.

The most success the Highlanders had was finishing second in 1904, 1906 and 1910; 1904 was the closest they would come to winning the AL pennant. That year, they would lose the deciding game on the last day of the season to the Boston Americans, who would later become the Boston Red Sox. This had much historical significance, as the Highlanders' role in the pennant race caused the Giants to announce that they would not play the World Series against the AL pennant winner. 1904 was the last year no World Series was played until 90 years later in the strike-truncated 1994 season. It would also be the last time Boston would beat New York in a pennant-deciding game for a full century (2004).

New owners, a new home, and a new name: the Polo Grounds Era (1913-1922)

The Polo Grounds, home of the Yankees from 1913 to 1922

The Polo Grounds, home of the Yankees from 1913 to 1922

The Polo Grounds burned down in 1911 and the Highlanders allowed the Giants to play in Hilltop Park during reconstruction. Relations between the two teams warmed, and the Highlanders would move into the newly rebuilt Polo Grounds in 1913. Now playing on the Harlem River, a far cry from their high-altitude home, the name "Highlanders" no longer applied, and fell into disuse among the press. The media had also called the team the "Yankees" (a synonym for "Americans", the team being an American League franchise) for a number of years, so in 1913 the team became known exclusively as the New York Yankees.

By the mid 1910s, owners Farrell and Devery had become estranged and were both in dire need of money. At the start of 1915, they sold the team to Colonel Jacob Ruppert and Captain Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston. Ruppert inherited a brewery fortune, providing the Yankees with an owner who possessed deep pockets and a willingness to dig into them to produce a winning team. This would lead the team to more success and prestige than Ruppert could ever have envisioned.

Babe Ruth in 1920, the first year he joined the Yankees

Babe Ruth in 1920, the first year he joined the Yankees

Sluggers and the Stadium: the Ruth and Gehrig Era (1923-1935)

In the years around 1920, the Yankees, the Red Sox, and the Chicago White Sox had a detente. Their actions, which antagonized Ban Johnson garnered them the nickname the "Insurrectos". This detente paid off well for the Yankees as they enlarged the payroll. Most new players who would later contribute to the team's success came from the Red Sox, whose owner, Harry Frazee, was trading players to them for large sums of money. Other important newcomers in this period were manager Miller Huggins and general manager Ed Barrow. The hiring of Huggins by Ruppert would cause a break between the owners that eventually led to Ruppert buying Huston out in 1923. But pitcher-turned-outfielder Babe Ruth was the most talented of all the acquisitions from Boston. The outcome of the trade would haunt the Red Sox for the next 86 years. They would not win a World Series after 1918 until 2004, often finding themselves eliminated from the hunt as a result of the success of the Yankees. This phenomenon eventually became known as the Curse of the Bambino as the failure of the Red Sox and the success of the Yankees seemed almost supernatural, and all seemed to stem from that one trade.

Ruth's multitude of home runs proved so popular that the Yankees began drawing more people than their landlords, the Giants. In 1921, when the Yankees made their first World Series appearance, which was against the Giants, the Yankees were told to move out of the Polo Grounds after the 1922 season. Giants manager John McGraw was said to have commented that the Yankees should "move to some out-of-the-way place, like Queens", but they instead broke ground for a new ballpark in the Bronx, right across the Harlem River from the Polo Grounds. In 1922, the Yankees returned to the World Series again, facing a second defeat at the hands of the Giants.

Yankee Stadium as it looked during 1928-1936.

Yankee Stadium as it looked during 1928-1936.

In 1923, the Yankees moved to their new home, Yankee Stadium. It was the first triple-deck venue in baseball and seated an astounding 58,000. In the first game at Yankee Stadium, Babe Ruth hit a home run, which was fitting as it was his home runs and drawing power that paid for the stadium, giving it its nickname "The House That Ruth Built". At the end of the year, the Yanks faced the Giants for the third straight year in the World Series, and finally triumphed for their first championship. Prior to that point, the Giants had been the city's iconic or dominant team. From 1923 onward, the Yankees would assume that role, and the Giants would eventually transfer out of the city.

The 1927 Yankees lineup was so potent that it become known as "Murderers' Row", and some consider the team to be the best in the history of baseball (though similar claims have been made for other Yankee squads, notably those of 1939, 1961 and 1998).[1] The Yankees won an AL then-record 110 games with only 44 losses, and swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1927 World Series. Ruth's home run total of 60 in 1927 set a single-season home run record that would stand for 34 years. Meanwhile, first baseman Lou Gehrig had his first big season, batting .373 with 47 round-trippers and 175 RBIs, beating Ruth's single-season RBI mark (171 in 1921). In the next three years, the Philadelphia Athletics would take the AL pennant and two world championships.

In 1931, Joe McCarthy came in as manager, and would bring the Yankees back to the top of the AL. They met the Chicago Cubs in the 1932 World Series, sweeping them and bringing the team's streak of consecutive World Series game wins to 12. This series was made famous by Babe Ruth's famous "Called Shot" in game three of the series at Wrigley Field. This would be a fitting "swan song" to his illustrious postseason career, as Ruth would leave the Yankees, going to the NL Boston Braves after 1934, and would never see the postseason again.

The Yankee Clipper, Joe DiMaggio

The Yankee Clipper, Joe DiMaggio

Joltin' Joe: the DiMaggio Era (1936-1951)

With Ruth retired, Gehrig finally had a chance to take center stage, but it was only one year before a new titan appeared: Joe DiMaggio. The team would win an unprecedented four World Series wins from 1936 to 1939. For most of 1939, however, they would have to do it without Gehrig, who was forced by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to retire. The Yankees declared July 4, 1939 to be "Lou Gehrig Day", where they retired his number 4 (the first retired number in baseball), and which was made famous by Gehrig's speech, in which he declared himself "the luckiest man on the face of the earth".

Often described as the last year of the "Golden Era" before World War II and other realities intervened, 1941 was a thrilling year as America watched two major events unfold: Ted Williams of the Red Sox hunting for the elusive .400 batting average and Joe DiMaggio hitting in game, after game, after game. By the end of his hitting streak, DiMaggio had hit in 56 consecutive games, the current major league record.

Two months and one day after the Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1941 World Series, the Pearl Harbor attacks occurred, and many of the best players, including DiMaggio himself, went off to serve in the military. The Yankees still managed to pull out a win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1942. McCarthy was fired early in 1946, after a few slumping seasons, and after a few interim managers, Bucky Harris took the job, righting the ship and taking the Yankees to a hard fought series against the Dodgers.

Despite finishing only three games behind the first place Cleveland Indians in 1948, Harris was released in favor of Casey Stengel, who had a reputation of being a clown and managing bad teams. His tenure as Yankee field manager, however, was marked with success, and the "underdog" Yankees came from behind to catch and surprise the then powerful Red Sox on the last two days of the season, a face off that fueled the beginning of the modern Yankees-Red Sox rivalry. By this time, however, DiMaggio's career was winding down, and the "Yankee Clipper" retired after the 1951 season. This year also marked the arrival of the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, who was one of several new stars that would fill the gap.

Stengel's squad in the 1950s: the Stengel Era (1951-1959)

Casey Stengel on a 1955 cover of Time Magazine

Casey Stengel on a 1955 cover of Time Magazine

Bettering the clubs of the McCarthy era, the Yankees won the world series five consecutive times (1949-1953) under Stengel, which continues to be the major league record. Led by players like center fielder Mickey Mantle, pitcher Whitey Ford, and catcher Yogi Berra, Stengel's teams won 10 pennants and seven World Series titles in his twelve seasons as the Yankees manager. Casey Stengel was also a master at publicity for the team and for himself, even landing a cover story in Time magazine in 1955.

The team won over 100 games in 1954, but the Indians took the pennant with an AL record 111 wins. In 1955, the Dodgers finally beat the Yankees in the World Series, after five Series losses to the Yankees, but the Yankees came back strong the next year. On October 8, 1956, in Game Five of the 1956 World Series against the Dodgers, pitcher Don Larsen threw the only perfect game in World Series history, which also remains the only no-hitter of any kind to be pitched in postseason play.

The Yankees lost the 1957 World Series to the Milwaukee Braves. Following the Series, the New York Giants and the Brooklyn Dodgers left for California, leaving the Yankees as New York's only team. In the 1958 World Series, the Yankees got their revenge against the Braves, and became the second team to win the Series after being down three games to one. For the decade, the Yankees won six World Series championships ('50, 51, '52, '53, '56, '58) and eight American League pennants (those six plus '55 and '57). Led by Mantle, Ford, Berra, Elston Howard (the Yankees' first African-American player), and the newly acquired Roger Maris, the Yankees entered the 1960's seeking to replicate the remarkable success of the 1950s.

The M&M Boys, Roger Maris (left) and Mickey Mantle (right)

The M&M Boys, Roger Maris (left) and Mickey Mantle (right)

The M&M Boys: the Mantle and Maris Era (1960-1964)

Arnold Johnson, owner of the Kansas City Athletics, former owner of the Stadium and longtime business associate of then-Yankees co-owners Del Webb and Dan Topping, had a "special relationship" with the Yankees. He would trade young players for cash and aging veterans. Invariably, these trades ended up being heavily tilted in the Yankees' favor, leading to accusations that the Athletics were little more than a Yankee farm team at the major league level. Ironically, Kansas City had been home to the Yankees' top farm team for almost 20 years before the Athletics moved there from Philadelphia in 1954. In 1960, Charles O. Finley purchased the A's, and put a cease to the trades. However, before this, the Yankees strengthened their supply of future prospects, including a young outfielder, Roger Maris. In 1960, Maris led the league in slugging percentage, RBIs, and extra base hits, finished second in home runs (one behind Mantle), and total bases, and won a Gold Glove and the American League MVP award.

The year 1961 would prove to be one of the most memorable in Yankee history. Throughout the summer, Mantle and Maris hit home runs at a fast pace, the media calling them the "M&M Boys". Ultimately, a severe hip infection forced Mantle to leave the lineup and drop out of the race. Maris continued, and on October 1, the last day of the season, hit home run number 61, surpassing Babe Ruth's single season home run record of 60. However, Commissioner Ford Frick (who, as it was discovered later, had ghostwritten for the Babe during his career) decreed that, since Maris had broken the record on the last day of a season that was eight games longer than the season Ruth hit his 60, two separate records would be kept. It would be 30 years before the dual record would be done away with, and Maris would hold the record alone until Mark McGwire broke it in 1998. Maris still holds the AL record.

The Yankees won the pennant with a 109-53 record and went on to defeat the Cincinnati Reds in the 1961 World Series. The team finished the year with a then record 240 home runs. In 1962, the sports scene in New York changed when the National League expanded to include a new team, the New York Mets of nearby Flushing, Queens. The Mets would lose a record 120 games while the Yankees would win the 1962 World Series, their tenth in the past sixteen years, defeating the San Francisco Giants in seven games.

The Yankees would reach the 1963 Fall Classic, but only to be swept by the Los Angeles Dodgers. After the season, Yogi Berra, who had just retired from playing, took over managerial duties. The aging Yankees returned the next year for a fifth straight world series, but were felled in seven games by the St. Louis Cardinals. It would be the last appearance for the Yanks in the World Series for over ten years.

New ownership and a steep decline: the CBS Era (1964-1972)

After the 1964 season, CBS purchased 80% of the Yankees from Topping and Webb for $11.2 million. With the new ownership, the team would begin to decline. In fact, the Yankees finished in the second division for the first time in 40 years in 1965. This was made worse by the introduction of the major league amateur draft that year, which meant that the Yankees could no longer sign any player they wanted. Webb sold his 10 percent stake to CBS before the year was out.

In 1966, the Yankees finished last in the AL for the first time since 1912. After they finished next-to-last in the 1967 season, the team's fortunes improved somewhat, but they would not become serious contenders again until 1974. Various reasons have been given for the decline, but the single biggest one was the Yankees' inability to replace their aging superstars with new ones, as they had done consistently in the previous five decades. Topping and Webb had owned the Yankees for 20 years, missing the World Series only five times and going 10-5 in the ones they did get to. By contrast, the CBS-owned teams never went to the World Series.

Also during this period the Yankees lost two of their signature broadcasters. The legendary "Voice of the Yankees", Mel Allen, was fired after the 1964 season, supposedly due to cost-cutting measures by long time broadcast sponsor Ballantine Beer. Two years later, Red Barber was let go. Some say this was because of his on-air mention of a paltry showing of 413 fans at then 67,000-seat Yankee Stadium during a game against the White Sox. Sports biographer David J. Halberstam also noted Barber's less-than-happy relationship with Joe Garagiola and even Phil Rizzuto, ex-major leaguers with whom he shared the booth.

Steinbrenner, Martin, Jackson, and Munson: the Bronx Zoo Era (1973-1981)

A group of investors, led by Cleveland-based shipbuilder George Steinbrenner, purchased the club from CBS on January 3, 1973 for $8.7 million. Mike Burke stayed on as president until he quit in April. Within a year, Steinbrenner bought out most of his other partners and became the team's principal owner, although Burke continued to hold a minority share into the 1980s.

One of Steinbrenner's major goals was to repair the Stadium, which had greatly deteriorated (along with the surrounding area) by the late 60's. CBS had suggested renovations, but the team would have to play elsewhere, and the Mets refused to open their home, Shea Stadium, to the Yankees. A new stadium in the Meadowlands, across town in New Jersey was also suggested. Finally, in mid-1972, Mayor John Lindsay stepped in. The city bought the Stadium, and began an extensive two-year renovation period. Since the city also owned Shea, the Mets had to allow the Yankees to play the two seasons out there. The renovations modernized the look of the stadium and reconfigured some of the seating.

During 1974 and 1975, Yankee Stadium was renovated into its current shape and structure shown here.

During 1974 and 1975, Yankee Stadium was renovated into its current shape and structure shown here.

After the 1974 season, Steinbrenner made a move that started the modern era of free agency, signing star pitcher James Augustus "Catfish" Hunter away from Oakland. Midway through the 1975 season, Steinbrenner made another move, hiring former second baseman Billy Martin as manager. With Martin as the helm, the Yankees reached the 1976 World Series, but were swept by the Cincinnati Reds, the famed "Big Red Machine".

Steinbrenner then added star Oakland outfielder Reggie Jackson to his roster. Jackson made a controversial comment during spring training, about the Yankee captain, catcher Thurman Munson, and he already had bad blood with Billy Martin, who had managed the Detroit Tigers and met Jackson in the 1972 postseason. Jackson, Martin, and Steinbrenner would repeatedly feud throughout Jackson's five-year contract. Martin was hired and fired by Steinbrenner five times over the next 13 years. This conflict, combined with the extremely rowdy Yankees fans of the late 1970s and the bad conditions of the Bronx, led to the organization and stadium being referred to as the "Bronx Zoo". Despite the turmoil, Jackson proved his worth in the 1977 World Series when he hit four home runs on four consecutive pitches from four different Dodgers' pitchers, three of them in the same game. Jackson's great performance in the postseason earned him the nickname "Mr. October".

Throughout the late 1970s, the race for the pennant often came to a close competition between the Yankees and the Red Sox. In the 1950s and early 1960s, the Yankees had been dominant while the Red Sox hadn't been a factor. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Yankees had been in last place while the Red Sox took charge. This was one of the first times that the two were contending and locked in a close fight, and every game between the two suddenly became important. The Yankees-Red Sox rivalry was at its helm, and was often bitter and ruthless, with brawls frequently erupting between players and fans.

On July 14, 1978, the Yankees were 14.5 games behind the Red Sox. Suddenly, the Yanks went on a winning streak, and by the time they met up for a pivotal four-game series at Fenway Park in early September, they were only four games out. The Yankees would sweep the Red Sox in what would become known as the "Boston Massacre", winning the games 15-3, 13-2, 7-0, and 7-4. The third game was a shutout pitched by "Louisiana Lightning" Ron Guidry, who would lead the majors with nine shutouts, 25 wins (only three losses), and a 1.74 ERA. Guidry also finished with 248 strikeouts, but Nolan Ryan's 260 strikeouts deprived Guidry of the pitching Triple Crown.

On the last day of the season, the two clubs finished in a tie for first place in the AL East. A one-game playoff (the 163rd game of the regular season) between the two teams was held to decide who would go on to the playoffs, with the game being held at Boston's Fenway Park. With Guidry matched up against former Yankee Mike Torrez, the Red Sox took an early 2-0 lead. In the seventh inning, the Yankees drove a stake through the hearts of their rivals' fans when Bucky Dent drove a three-run home run over the "Green Monster" (Fenway Park's famed left field wall), putting the Yankees up 3-2. Reggie Jackson's solo home run in the following inning would seal the eventual 5-4 win that gave the Yankees their 100th win of the season and their third straight AL East title; it also gave Guidry his 25th win. (The outcome of this game, for Red Sox fans, was one of several emotional moments in their team's history that had their fans wondering if the Red Sox were under some kind of Yankee curse.)

Thurman Munson's mask and mitt on display in Cooperstown .They previously hung in his unused locker as a memorial.

Thurman Munson's mask and mitt on display in Cooperstown .They previously hung in his unused locker as a memorial.

After beating the Kansas City Royals for the third consecutive year in the 1978 ALCS, the Yankees faced the Dodgers again in the World Series. They lost the first two games on the West Coast, but then came home to win all three games at Yankee Stadium. The team then would wrap up their 22nd World Championship in Game Six back in Los Angeles.

The 1970s would end on a tragic note for the Yankees. Munson, a devoted family man, attained a pilot's license and a private plane so that he could fly home on off days. On August 2, 1979, Munson was doing some test flights of his plane and crashed, dying from his injuries. Four days later, the entire team flew out to Canton, Ohio for the funeral, despite having a game later that day against the Orioles. Martin adamantly stated that the funeral was more important, and that he didn't care if they made it back in time, but they did return in time to play. It was a nationally televised game, and the emotional contest was highlighted by Bobby Murcer, a close friend of Munson's who was one the Yankees chose to give a eulogy that morning at the funeral. He used Munson's bat (which he gave to his fallen friend's wife after the game), and drove in all five of the team's runs in a dramatic 5-4 victory.

Before the game, Munson's locker sat empty except for his catching gear, a sad reminder for his teammates. His locker, labeled with his number 15, stands empty in the Yankee clubhouse to this day as a memorial. The number 15 has also been retired by the team.

 

The Mattingly Era (1982-1995)

Following the team's loss to the Dodgers in the 1981 World Series, the Yankees would go into their longest absence from the playoffs since 1921.

The Yankees of the 1980s, led by their All-Star first baseman Don Mattingly, had the most total wins of any major league team but failed to win a World Series (the first such team since the 1910s). They consistently had powerful offensive teams: Mattingly at various times was teammate to Dave Winfield, Rickey Henderson, Mike Pagliarulo, Steve Sax and Jesse Barfield, but the starting pitching rarely matched the team's performance at the plate. After posting a 22-6 record in 1985, arm problems caught up with Ron Guidry, and his career went into a steep decline in the next three years. Dennis Rasmussen, who won 18 games in 1986, could never match the feat. Rick Rhoden, acquired from the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1987, won 16 games that year but went only 14-14 in 1988.

The team came close to winning the AL East in 1985 and 1986, finishing second to the Toronto Blue Jays and Boston Red Sox respectively, but fell to fourth place in 1987 and fifth in 1988, despite having mid-season leads in the AL East standings both years.

By the end of the decade, the Yankees' offense was also on the decline. Henderson and Pagliarulo had departed by the middle of 1989, while back problems caught up with both Winfield (who missed the entire '89 season) and Mattingly (who missed almost the entire second half of 1990). Winfield's tenure with the team ended when he was dealt to the California Angels in May 1990 for Mike Witt. From 1989 to 1992, the team had a losing record, having spent large amounts of money on free-agent players and draft picks that did not meet up to expectations. In 1990, the Yankees had the worst record in Major League Baseball, and their first last-place finish since 1966.

On July 1, 1990, pitcher Andy Hawkins became the first Yankee ever to lose a no-hitter. Third baseman Mike Blowers committed an error, followed by two walks and an error by the left fielder Jim Leyritz with the bases loaded, scoring all three runners and the batter. The 4-0 loss to the Chicago White Sox was the largest margin of any no-hitter loss in the 20th century. Ironically, the Yankees (and Hawkins) were again no-hit for six innings in a rain-shortened game against the White Sox eleven days later.

The poor showing in the 1980s and 1990s would soon start to change as Steinbrenner hired Howard Spira to uncover damaging information on Winfield; Steinbrenner was suspended from day-to-day team operations by then-Commissioner Fay Vincent when the plot was revealed. This allowed management to implement a coherent acquisition/development program without interference. General managers Gene Michael and Bob Watson, along with manager Buck Showalter, shifted the club's emphasis from buying talent to developing talent through the farm system, and then holding on to it. This new system brought up key players such as Bernie Williams, Derek Jeter, Jorge Posada, Andy Pettitte and Mariano Rivera, who might have been traded away early for big-name talent had Steinbrenner remained in charge.[2] The first significant success came in 1994, when the Yankees had the best record in the AL. However, the season was cut short by the 1994 baseball strike, and there were no playoffs. A year later, they made it to the playoffs in the new wild card slot, and were eliminated only after a memorable 1995 American League Division Series against the Seattle Mariners where the Yankees won the first two games at home and dropped the next three in Seattle.

Mattingly, suffering greatly from his back injury, retired after the 1995 season. He had the unfortunate distinction of beginning and ending his career on years bracketed by Yankee World Series appearances (1981 and 1996).

A new dynasty: the Torre, Jeter, and Rivera Era (1996-2000)

The cover of Newsday, showing closer John Wetteland jumping into the arms of catcher Jim Leyritz after the final out of the 1996 World Series.

The cover of Newsday, showing closer John Wetteland jumping into the arms of catcher Jim Leyritz after the final out of the 1996 World Series.

After the Yankees fell to the Mariners, Steinbrenner replaced Showalter with Joe Torre, who brought in Don Zimmer as bench coach and former Yankees pitching star Mel Stottlemyre as pitching coach. One of Showalter's coaches, popular former Yankees second baseman Willie Randolph, was retained by Torre as a third-base coach. Torre had a mediocre run as a manager in the National League, and the choice was initially derided ("Clueless Joe" ran the headline on the New York Post). However, his smooth manner proved to be what the team needed, and his tenure would prove to be, by far, the longest under Steinbrenner's ownership.

The Yankees not only made it to the 1996 playoffs, but they went 8-0 on the road. Following a win in the ALCS against the Baltimore Orioles (which included an instance of fan interference by young Jeffrey Maier, which was called a home run for the Yankees), the team went to the World Series against the Atlanta Braves. Despite losing the first two games at home by a combined score of 16-1, they won in six games and ended the team's 18-year championship drought. Homegrown shortstop Derek Jeter was named Rookie of the Year, an auspicious start to his career with the Yankees. After their first World Series win since 1978, the Yankees signed lefties David Wells and Mike Stanton to improve the pitching staff. They also allowed closer (and Series MVP) John Wetteland to leave as a free agent. The empty spot was filled with Wetteland's setup man, Mariano Rivera.

In 1997, the team made it to the playoffs again, but lost in the 1997 ALDS to the Cleveland Indians. Watson was fired as GM, and was replaced by Brian Cashman, a former Yankee intern. Cashman made many key acquisitions to improve the team, including third baseman Scott Brosius, second baseman and leadoff man Chuck Knoblauch, outfielder Darryl Strawberry and starting pitcher Orlando "El Duque" Hernandez.

An iconic image of Joe Torre as he is carried off the field after the Yankees won the 2000 World Series. Bernie Williams is visible in the bottom left corner.

An iconic image of Joe Torre as he is carried off the field after the Yankees won the 2000 World Series. Bernie Williams is visible in the bottom left corner.

The 1998 Yankees are widely acknowledged to be one of the greatest teams in baseball history, compiling a then-AL record 114 regular season wins against just 48 losses and then sweeping the San Diego Padres in the 1998 World Series. They went 11-2 in the playoffs for a combined record of 125-50. Their 125 wins is a major league record, though their AL regular season record was surpassed by the 2001 Seattle Mariners, who went 116-46. On top of all this, on May 17, 1998 David Wells, who would later claim to have been hung-over that day, pitched a perfect game against the Minnesota Twins at Yankee Stadium. After the 1998 season, Wells would be traded to the Toronto Blue Jays for Roger Clemens, who had just completed two consecutive Cy Young Award and pitching triple crown seasons.

A little over a year later, on July 18, 1999, which was "Yogi Berra Day" at the Stadium, David Cone pitched a perfect game against the Montréal Expos. Coincidentally, Don Larsen, who pitched the perfect game in the 1956 World Series, was in attendance and had thrown out the ceremonial first pitch to Berra, his catcher for that storied game. Another coincidence is that Larsen and Wells both attended Point Loma High School in San Diego, California.

After winning the Eastern division that year, and defeating the Texas Rangers for the third time in the ALDS, the Yankees met up with their longtime rivals, the Boston Red Sox in the ALCS, the first meeting of the two in a true post-season series. Clemens, a former Red Sox star pitcher, pitched in the third game against new pitching star Pedro Martinez, who was the year's winner of the Cy Young Award and pitching triple crown. The greatly hyped matchup was billed "Cy Young vs Cy Old" by Red Sox fans. The Sox would blast Clemens 13-1, but it was the only win they had, as they lost the series in five games. the Yankees would go on to win the 1999 World Series, Clemens winning the clinching fourth game in the Bronx. This gave the 1998-1999 Yankees a 22-3 record (including four series sweeps) in six consecutive post-season series.

In 2000, the Yankees battled through the post-season, winning the ALDS against the Oakland A's after the full five games, and beating the Mariners in the sixth game of the ALCS. This led to a much anticipated meeting with cross-town rivals and National League Champions, the New York Mets, in the first Subway Series championship since 1956. The Yankees won the first two, but a Mets win in the third game snapped their streak of World Series wins at 14 (from 1996-2000). This beat the club's previous record of 12 (in 1927, 1928, and 1932). A run scored by the Mets off of Rivera snapped his string of 34⅓ consecutive scoreless innings in the playoffs, which broke Whitey Ford's streak, a record he took from Ruth. The team would go on to win the fourth game and then, in the fifth game, Mets star catcher Mike Piazza would hit a long fly ball to deep center in the bottom of the ninth, which would just miss leaving Shea, instead landing in Bernie Williams' glove and completing the Yankees' threepeat. During this feat, the total post-season record was 33-8. The Yankees are the most recent major league team to repeat as World Series champions and after the 2000 season they joined the Yankee teams of 1936-1939 and 1949-1953, as well as the 1972-1974 Oakland Athletics as the only teams to win at least three consecutive World Series.

Falling just short: the Torre, Jeter, Rivera, and A-Rod Era (2001-2007)

President Bush tosses out the ceremonial first pitch before a 2-1 Yankee victory in Game 3 of the 2001 World Series.

President Bush tosses out the ceremonial first pitch before a 2-1 Yankee victory in Game 3 of the 2001 World Series.

The next seven years were marked by successful regular seasons and playoff appearances, but the Yankees were unable to win any championships.

In the emotional times of October 2001 in New York City, following the September 11 attack on New York's World Trade Center, the Yankees defeated the Oakland A's three games to two in the ALDS, and then the Seattle Mariners, who had won 116 games, four games to one in the ALCS. By winning the pennant for a fourth straight year, the 1998-2001 Yankees joined the 1921-1924 New York Giants, and the Yankee teams of '36-'39, '49-'53, '55-'58 and '60-'64 as the only dynasties to reach at least four straight pennants. The Yankees had now won eleven consecutive postseason series in consecutive years. However, the Yankees lost the World Series to the Arizona Diamondbacks in seven games, when Yankee star closer Mariano Rivera uncharacteristically lost the lead - and the Series - in the bottom of the ninth inning of the final game.

After the 2001 season, the Yankees lost 4 key members of their championship teams, Paul O'Neill, Scott Brosius, Tino Martinez and Chuck Knoblauch. But the Yankees still finished the 2002 season with an AL best record of 103-58, winning the division by 10.5 games over the Red Sox. The season was highlighted by Alfonso Soriano becoming the first second baseman ever to hit 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in a season, as well as newly acquired first baseman Jason Giambi's 41 home runs, including a walkoff grand slam with the Yankees down by 3 runs in the 14th inning to the Minnesota Twins. In the ALDS, the Yankees lost to the Anaheim Angels in four games.

In 2003, the Yankees once again had the best league record (101-61), highlighted by Roger Clemens winning his 300th game and reaching 4000 strikeouts, joining Nolan Ryan and Steve Carlton as the only pitchers with more than 4000 strikeouts. They easily defeated the Minnesota Twins in the ALDS, three games to one. In the ALCS, they defeated their rival Boston Red Sox in a dramatic seven game series, which featured a bench-clearing brawl in Game Three and a series-ending walk-off home run by Aaron Boone in the bottom of the 11th inning of game seven. In the 2003 World Series the Yankees were heavily favored against the surprising wild-card winning Florida Marlins. However, the series would turn out to be very similar to the 2001 series against Arizona, as Marlins' pitching shut down the Yankees offense and took the series in six games.

Alex Rodriguez, 2005 & 2007 season American League MVP

Alex Rodriguez, 2005 & 2007 season American League MVP

After the 2003 season, the Yankees added two all-star sluggers, Gary Sheffield and Alex Rodriguez, with Rodriguez moving to third base with Jeter entrenched at shortstop. Throughout 2004, however, the Yankees' weakness was their starting pitching, but despite this, they managed to win over 100 games for the third straight year. In the ALDS, the Yankees once again met and defeated the Twins three games to one. In the ALCS, the Yankees met their rival Boston Red Sox again, and became the first team in professional baseball history, and only the third team in North American pro sports history, to lose a best-of-seven series after taking a 3-0 series lead.

In 2005 the Yankees spent most of the season chasing the Red Sox for the division title, but finally clinched the division in the second-to-last game of the season against the Red Sox. Alex Rodriguez won the American League MVP award, becoming the first Yankee to win the award since Don Mattingly in 1985. Giambi was named Comeback Player of the Year, as voted by fans. Another highlight of the season was the record-setting pitching by journeyman Aaron Small, who became just the fourth pitcher in history to win at least ten games without a loss. In the ALDS, the Angels defeated the Yankees in five games in the first round of the postseason, marking the second time in four years that the Angels beat the Yankees in the first round.

An in-game meeting on the mound featuring, from left to right, Derek Jeter, Robinson Cano, Alex Rodriguez, Jason Giambi, Randy Johnson, Jorge Posada, and Joe Torre.

An in-game meeting on the mound featuring, from left to right, Derek Jeter, Robinson Cano, Alex Rodriguez, Jason Giambi, Randy Johnson, Jorge Posada, and Joe Torre.

In the 2005-06 offseason, general manager Brian Cashman was given more control of the direction of the Yankees, and the Yankees signed center fielder Johnny Damon from the archrival Red Sox. The Yankees again chased the Red Sox through the first four months of 2006, but on August 18 the Yankees entered Fenway Park for a five game series with a 1.5 game lead. The series opened up with a doubleheader that the Yankees swept 12-4 and 14-11, echoing the Boston Massacre of 1978, and prompting the Boston Globe's Dan Shaughnessy to dub the doubleheader sweep the "Son of Massacre". The Yankees went on to sweep all five games (calling the series the "Second Boston Massacre", outscoring the Red Sox 49-26,[3] and the Red Sox never recovered, eventually finishing 3rd in the division.

The division win was the ninth consecutive AL East title for the Yankees. When the New York Mets won their division (snapping the Atlanta Braves' eleven-year stranglehold on the NL East), it marked the first time ever that both New York teams won their respective divisions in the same year. Their 97-65 record tied the Mets for the best record of the year, giving New Yorkers hopes for another Subway Series. However, the Yankees lost to the Detroit Tigers in four games in the ALDS, while the Mets lost the NLCS to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games.

On October 11, 2006, days after the ALDS was over, tragedy struck when pitcher Cory Lidle died when his plane crashed into a high-rise apartment building in Manhattan. Lidle was the second active Yankee to be killed in a crash of his own private plane, following Thurman Munson's death in 1979.

During the 2006-2007 off-season, the Yankees traded away Gary Sheffield and Randy Johnson, did not re-sign longtime outfielder Bernie Williams,[4] and signed former Yankee Andy Pettitte.

Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez

Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez

The start of the 2007 season was highlighted by Alex Rodriguez setting or tying AL and/or MLB records for most home runs in his team's first 14 games,[5] 15 games,[6] and 18 games, finally setting the AL record and tying Albert Pujols for the MLB record for most home runs, 14, in the month of April.[7] But pitching problems hurt early on, "highlighted" by the Yankees using five or more pitchers in 10 consecutive games to end the month of April, the longest such streak in the majors in the past 50 years.[8] On May 7, the Yankees set another undesirable pitching record by being the first team in MLB history to use 10 different starting pitchers in its first 30 games,[9] and ultimately the Yankees set an AL record by making over 500 pitching changes during the season.[10] The pitching problems led to the signing of Roger Clemens for close to $18 million for the last 4 months of the season. On May 29, the Yankees were 14.5 games behind the Boston Red Sox in the American League East, and were also 8.5 games out of the wild card spot.

On June 18, 2007 the Yankees broke new ground by bringing the first two professional baseball players from the People's Republic of China to the MLB, [11] and also became the first team in MLB history to sign an advertising deal with a Chinese company. [12]

Although failing to be above .500 going into the All-Star break for the first time since 1995, the Yankees were the hottest team in the majors the second half of the year, and on September 26 they clinched a Wild Card spot in the ALDS. However, although they cut the lead to 1.5 games in late September, they were unable to catch the Red Sox for the AL East title, breaking their streak of nine straight AL East division titles. Highlights of the season included Alex Rodriguez hitting his 500th home run at Yankee Stadium, being the first player to hit his 500th at Yankee Stadium since Mickey Mantle and the youngest player to have ever reached that mark, and winning the MVP. Also, Derek Jeter hit for his 6th consecutive 200-hit season, a feat matched in Yankee history only by Lou Gehrig.

In the 2007 ALDS against the Cleveland Indians, the Yankees lost Game 1 as the Indians pounded 19-game winner Chien-Ming Wang. In Game 2, Andy Pettitte dominated the Indians, until the 8th inning when Joba Chamberlain was bothered by an infestation of mayflies and lost the lead, and the Yankees eventually lost the game in extra innings. In Game 3 the Yankees rallied from a 3-1 deficit to win. However, in Game 4 the Indians won the series by defeating the Yankees, 6-4, with Wang again pitching poorly.

Looking to the Future: the Girardi Era (2008-Present)

Logo for the 2008 All-Star Game at Yankee Stadium.

Logo for the 2008 All-Star Game at Yankee Stadium.

After Game 2 of the ALDS, Yankees owner George Steinbrenner said that if the Yankees lost the series, manager Joe Torre would not likely be brought back. Because of Steinbrenner's comments and the Yankees' third straight loss in the ALDS, Torre's status was uncertain as the off-season started. Eventually the Yankees offered Torre a new contract which cut his pay by $2 million, and offered one million for every round of the playoffs he made. Disliking the inclusion of incentives in the deal and unhappy with the pay cut, Torre rejected it, ending his tenure as manager of the Yankees.[13] The Yankees then signed former catcher Joe Girardi to a three-year deal worth $7.5 million to manage the club.[14]

The Yankees moved quickly to maintain several key players following the agreement with Girardi. After star third baseman Alex Rodriguez chose to opt out of the contract, seemingly ending his stay with the Yankees, he negotiated a new record-breaking deal with New York that will pay him at least $275 million over the next ten seasons.[15] The Yankees also re-signed icons Mariano Rivera, Jorge Posada and Andy Pettitte. In December 2007, the Yankees signed LaTroy Hawkins and traded for Jonathan Albaladejo to bolster their bullpen and fill the hole left by the departed Luis Vizcaino.

The 2008 season will be the last season played at historic Yankee Stadium, after which the team will move to the New Yankee Stadium across the street. Because of this, the 2008 Major League Baseball All-Star Game will be played at Yankee Stadium.

information provided by: www.wikipedia.org


Yankees Advertisers/Sponsors

This section is new and will be dedicated to the advertisers and sponsors who have been a part of the Yankees over their history.

1.) Ballantine Beer - Continued with the Yankees through 1973 in the pubs and on the radio.  Their ads made their debut on the back cover of the yearbook and in the scorecards.  They also sponsored all of the radiocasts on WHN.  The Yankees went to WMCA in 1971.  By 1974, they were history with the Yankees.  They went to the Mets in1974 after Rheingold went bust. (Credit: Paul Doherty)

2.) Schaefer Beer Advertising was used in Ebbet's Field and later, the company would become a sponsor of the New York Mets.  Then they had the naming rights to Schaefer Stadium for the NE Patriot.

Below are coasters from Schaefer Beer made in 1970.

3.) Longines - The first picture below is of the clock that was in Old Yankee Stadium.  It was auctioned off by LiveAuctioneers in 2008 with an Estimate of $20,000-$30,000 and a starting big of $10,000.  The clock in 49 1/2" x 40 1/4".  The clock was composed of metal and glass.

 

 

 

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